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One system does not fit all

January 13, 2004

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Ventilation systems come in a variety of types for different types of welding processes and varying fabrication facility setups. The emphasis on proper application of these systems and best use of the components used in them comes from an increased interest in cleaner air for the welder.

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Rolling bolsters bolster productivity

January 13, 2004

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To thrive and experience growth and healthy profits, a stamping company must have systems in place that allow flexible manufacturing and minimize press downtime. Changing from one job to the next in the least amount of time possible is one of the primary factors impacting productivity and a company's ability to adjust to the changing needs of customers quickly and efficiently.

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Hydroforming heats up

January 13, 2004

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Hydroforming was one of the fastest-growing metal forming technologies during the 1990s. Most of U.S. industry cooled down during and after the recession of 2001, but things have been heating up lately, and the world of hydroforming is no exception. The North American Hydroforming Conference and Exhibition (Sept. 29 – Oct. 1 in Dayton, Ohio), which was sponsored by the Tube & Pipe Association, International® (TPA), and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), showcased new techniques, equipment, and applications that are moving the industry forward.

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Structural tube on campus

January 13, 2004

Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Wash., is known for its strong science programs. "Flying Bridge," a structure designed by artist and sculptor Ed Carpenter, physically and metaphorically spans the biology and chemistry departments in the university's new Dean Science Building. Carpenter, who designed the bridge with engineering consultation from Peterson Structural Engineers Inc., teamed up with Albina Pipe Bending Co. Inc. to tackle the project's material bending and fabrication requirements.

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Troubleshooting compression bending

January 13, 2004

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You can achieve nearly trouble-free bending by being aware of the causes of typical compression bending problems and by correctly operating and maintaining the compression bender. Most compression bending problems are one of three types:Flattening or collapsing on the outside of the bend.Crimping...

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Appliancemaker reduces downtime with stamping press feed system

January 13, 2004

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The Whirlpool Co. builds refrigerators at its facility in Fort Smith, Ark. The company stamps the appliance parts—large and small, galvanized, cold-rolled, and aluminum—on approximately 35 presses. The majority of its stamping presses are straight-side machines, although some are open-back inclinable (OBI), and a few are hydraulic.

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Producing side-impact profiles

January 13, 2004

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The ramming machine bores into the side of the new automobile at a speed of 50 kilometers (31 miles) per hour. Within a fraction of a second, sensors situated all over the test dummy signal details of the stress load. Shortly afterward the overall results of the Euro-NCAP crash test will appear in all the specialized automobile magazines.

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Beating 'world' pricing

January 13, 2004

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During the depths of the manufacturing slowdown that has cost the fabricated metal products sector nearly 300,000 jobs since 2000, Steven Southwell, president of Des Plaines, Ill.-based Nu-Way Industries Inc., faced a depressing challenge from one of his multinational OEM customers??either meet the ??total cost of acquisition? achieved in China or purchase the part from the Chinese supplier, inventory it, and incorporate it into the family of parts supplied by Nu-Way.

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Family business going strong after 100 years

December 11, 2003

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The average lifespan of a family-owned business is 24 years, and 60 percent of family-owned businesses do not have a clear succession plan. Tell that to the Peddinghaus Corporation and you might be in for a big "Oh really?" In business for 100 years and with a Peddinghaus still at the helm, the family-owned manufacturer of steel construction industry equipment clearly is a statistical exception.

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Selecting a stamping die pressure system, Part I

December 11, 2003

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This article is part one of a two-part series that focuses on the different stamping die pressure systems available, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. The article also discusses some of the controlling factors that contribute to system selection.

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Getting the best results in gas-shielded FCAW

December 11, 2003

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The demand for flux cored arc welding (FCAW) has grown significantly over the past 10 years. Manufacturers who weld carbon, stainless, low-alloy, and high-alloy steel are turning to this process primarily because:It has a high deposition rate.It can be used to weld in all positions with designated...

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Finding and creating value in your stamping operation

December 11, 2003

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A different breed of competitor has emerged recently in the stamping industry to challenge traditional thinking. These competitors are companies that focus on time as a basic measurement, giving them the advantages of flexibility, innovation, responsiveness, and low costs. They know how to make money in stamping operations and take business away from less astute competitors.

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Filling in the blanks

December 11, 2003

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 Because of sluggish economies and uncertain markets, the need to hone a competitive edge is more sharply defined. Many stampers are doing this by taking control of their material inventory and production schedules by adding a cut-to-length blank shearing line.An in-house blank shearing line...

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Pulling taffy and producing tube

December 11, 2003

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Do you remember going to the county fair and watching candy makers make taffy? As a child I often would watch the whirling motion of the taffy pull machine as it whipped and pulled and whipped and pulled again and again until the candy was the right consistency, texture, and color. As long as the...

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Selecting a welding frequency

December 11, 2003

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Early power supplies for contact and induction welding for tube production, which were introduced in the 1950s, operated at 300 to 400 kHz. Modern power supplied, introduced in the 1990s, are variable from 200 to 400 kHz. While using any frequency in this range can produce acceptable welds for most applications, finite element analysis can be helpful for finding the optimal frequency for a particular gauge and material.

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