Sawing Articles

The sawing technology area has enough depth to cover more than just band and circular sawing machines. It has information on blade selection and use, lubricant selection, and sawing safety.

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Making the most of your saw blade

November 6, 2007

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Recognizing heat and vibration in sawing applications is easy. The tough part is finding out why they are happening. By becoming familiar with blade speed and feed rates, blade selection, and blade break-in, fabricators will find that the saw blade is productive for a longer period of time.

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Tube cutting bundles

Bundles of Joy

July 10, 2007

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Using a band saw to cut bundles of structural shapes is good for productivity but bad for band saw blade wear. Knowledge of application-specific tooth designs, tooth pitch, band tension, band speeds, and cutting fluid will help maintain blade life.

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Saw coolant image

Sawing? Cool it.

June 12, 2007

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Nearly every metal sawing operation can become more cost-effective with a properly mixed and maintained sawing coolant. Proper use of sawing coolant improves cutting rates by balancing the combination of cooling and lubrication of the blade. Quality coolant improves the cut finish and can extend blade life by as much as 20 percent.

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Angling for a good cut

July 11, 2006

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Good sawing and maintenance practices can help alleviate problems that can occur when making angle cuts in structurals and tubing. Addressing the stock, machine setup, the blade, the cutting fluid, and the saw itself may not completely rid fabricators of problems, but it can help keep the operation profitable and relatively painless.

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Cutting right to the point

June 13, 2006

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Experience and education are allowing metal fabricators to become more familiar with circular saw blades and the saw designed to run them. Choosing and applying the correct blade, along with proper maintenance, can provide an efficient method for a metal cutting operation.

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Cutting to the chase - Integrating secondary operations

January 10, 2006

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Tube cut-off machines have evolved to integrate end forming and bending capabilities that normally are considered secondary operations. The suitability of a cutting method to be integrated inline with end forming and bending depends on each cutting method’s characteristics and the bending and end forming requirements.

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Creating an efficient offline band sawing system Part II

December 13, 2005

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Planning an offline band sawing system can be complicated because it can affect, and is affected by, many interrelated factors. Breaking it down to infeed, sawing, and outfeed helps to frame the planning by breaking it down to three subprocesses. Furthermore, answering 15 pertinent questions can help you tailor an efficient sawing operation to your specific facility and sawing applications.

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Creating an efficient offline band sawing system

December 13, 2005

By:

Planning an offline band sawing system can be complicated because it can affect, and is affected by, many interrelated factors. Breaking it down to infeed, sawing, and outfeed helps to frame the planning by breaking it down to three subprocesses. Furthermore, answering 15 pertinent questions can help you tailor an efficient sawing operation to your specific facility and sawing applications.

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Creating an efficient offline band sawing system Part I

October 11, 2005

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Planning an offline band sawing system can be complicated because it can affect, and is affected by, many interrelated factors. Breaking it down to infeed, sawing, and outfeed helps to frame the planning by breaking it down to three subprocesses. Furthermore, answering 15 pertinent questions can help you tailor an efficient sawing operation to your specific facility and sawing applications.

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Band sawing in short order

June 14, 2005

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Many metal fabricators, machine manufacturers, welding repair shops, and steel service centers encounter unique metal separation problems, particularly with band sawing. They often have to cut a variety of metal grades, shapes, and sizes with only a few band saw machines.

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Preventive maintenance on sawing equipment

December 7, 2004

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Usually no more than 30 to 60 minutes are needed to do all of the necessary checks and maintenance on band saws. This is a small investment of time in relation to the cost savings that can be attained by maximizing the life of the machine and blade.

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Miter sawing adds eye appeal to structural steel

August 10, 2004

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As a structural steel fabricator, you may have operated a miter saw. The fact is, however, in many other shops the miter feature has rarely been used because, traditionally, most steel buildings—from the skyscraper to the humble warehouse—have been designed without miter cuts. Beam ends...

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Boosting band saw blade life

August 10, 2004

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Because intermittent cutting can be hard on blades, you should find ways to increase blade productivity for your environment. Several guidelines, such as selecting the right blade tooth size, breaking in the blades, and choosing the right blade for the job are ways to help improve the productivity of your band saw blade.

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Pursuing a plate-cutting saw

May 4, 2004

Metal Cutting Service, City of Industry (Los Angeles), Calif., specializes in sawing metals. President David Viel explained the company's strategy: "We do not buy or sell anything, we just add value to others' products." Although it does very little advertising, the 26-employee company has customers throughout the U.S., Europe, and Asia, even though the cost to ship material can be substantial.

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Band sawing bundled shapes

October 9, 2003

Bundled side by side or top to bottom, thin-walled structural metal shapes pose a productivity dilemma for sawing shops. Band saw efficiency typically is measured in cubic inches of stock removed per minute, and the most efficient cuts are those made in large, solid pieces.

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