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Die Basics 101: Part X

October 10, 2006 | By Art Hedrick

Cutting is the most severe metalworking process that takes place in a die and shouldn't be taken lightly. Cutting Basics Cutting metal requires great force. For example, it takes approximately 78,000 lbs. of pressure to cut a 10-in.-diameter blank from 0.100-in.-thick mild steel. Consequently,...

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Machine components you can fabricate with an abrasive jet

October 10, 2006 | By Dr. John H. Olsen

Many machine components formerly made with conventional machining techniques now can be made easily and cost-effectively with abrasive waterjet cutting. This article discusses some of these components. It also gives examples of abrasive waterjet-produced signs and labels that can be used to enhance your products.

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The evolution of tube hydroforming

October 10, 2006 | By Gary Morphy

The growth in hydroforming use has slowed as tube hydroformers, particularly in the automotive industry, are taking a step back to examine process options in an effort to determine the most efficient, cost-effective process. Some even have reverted to stamping and welding formerly hydroformed parts. This article explains how the industry got to this point and where it's headed.

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Welder health and safety — Who's responsible?

October 10, 2006 | By Vicki Bell

The "Welding Wire" e-newsletter asked subscribers their opinions about who is responsible for ensuring welder health and safety. This article describes the hazards inherent in welding and contains insight from a welding instructor, a business owner, and individuals with personal knowledge of unsafe operations.

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Luminous aluminum makes light work

October 10, 2006 | By Kate Bachman

Hapco Aluminum Pole Products, Abingdon, Va., fabricates aluminum light posts that must be beautiful while standing up to wind, and the forces of nature.

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Lasers loom larger in tube, pipe cutting

October 10, 2006 | By Peter Beck

Laser technology has a new, larger role in cutting tube and pipe. It's suitable not only for niche applications, but also for broader tube cutting applications such as cutoff.

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automotive brake assembly

Bigger is better

October 10, 2006 | By Bernard Swiecki

All automotive suppliers, regardless of size, find themselves facing a business environment more challenging than any they have previously experienced. Size with the economies of scale it brings is just one of numerous strategies that can be used to cope with the demanding nature of today's automotive industry.

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Growing, growing ... gone?

October 10, 2006

The fortune of Custom Tool & Mfg. Co. changed last year with a cold call from a representative of MFG.com. After signing on for the Web-based service, the fabricator is finding several fabricating jobs to bid on each week.

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3 steps to better laser maintenance

October 10, 2006 | By Bernie Olguin, Dru Schwartz, Jeff Hahn

Laser machine users know it, but often ignore it. Laser manufacturers swear by it, but often don't push it. It's maintenance, and it should be the watchword of anyone who owns and operates a laser.

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Manufacturing evolution in the job shop

October 10, 2006

Gardner Manufacturing, Horicon, Wis., needed automation and flexibility to keep up with more challenging customer demands. The contract manufacturer found its answer with two laser cutting devices with automated material handling and three new press brakes capable of precision bending.

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Aluminum pipe pioneer streamlines tube mill welding

October 10, 2006 | By Eric Lundin

When Hastings Irrigation Pipe Co., a manufacturer of aluminum pipe, needed to replace its decades-old welding power supplies, it looked for units that could weld a variety of thicknesses at fast welding speeds. What it found were power supplies that allowed the company to run its mills faster and save money in several ways.

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Transfer technology

October 10, 2006

Venest Industries, an automotive parts supplier based in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, needed an automated transfer system that could be parked away from the machine bed during progressive operations and die changes, so that new dies could be delivered to the press via an overhead crane.

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Die Basics 101

October 10, 2006 | By Art Hedrick

Editor's Note: "Die Basics 101" is a 17-part article.

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French tube fabricator meets volume increase with orbital welding

October 10, 2006 | By Dick Herzfeld, Richard Herzfeld

CMI Enterprise is a 107-person fabricating shop located in the scenic region of Saint Sylvain D'Anjou, France, serving the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and chemical industries. CMI began experiencing growing pains. For the process equipment and heat exchanger projects, CMI selected orbital welding equipment from Polysoude [U.S. division is Astro Arc Polysoude Inc.]. to increase productivity rates. A welder can make more welds per day because the weld presents a regular geometry without overlay, and requires no secondary operations, such as grinding or cleaning.

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Flushing out four-letter words: rust, dirt, and wear - TheFabricator

Flushing out four-letter words: rust, dirt, and wear (Part I)

October 10, 2006 | By Mike Pelham

Rust, wear, and dirt cost tube fabricators and producers millions of dollars annually, and they can be the bane of tube processes. Analyzing the criteria for selecting the lubricant, cleaner, and rust preventative can help provide maximum protection.

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