Arc Welding Articles

The arc welding technology area focuses on the most commonly used arc welding processes, mainly GMAW/MIG, GTAW/TIG, SMAW/stick, and plasma. The articles and press releases cover processes and power sources, plus all of the related items—electrodes and wire, wire feeders, fixtures, manipulators, positioners, and power sources. If you need information on personal protective gear, ventilation systems, and safety practices for welders, see our Safety coverage area.

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Female student achieves first for school, state

March 7, 2006

Jessica Jelinski takes pride in doing her best when it comes to welding -- that's what propelled her to win first place in the SkillsUSA Wisconsin state welding competition in 2005. Today she uses that work ethic to further her welding career and teach other young people about the trades.

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Staying grounded

March 7, 2006

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Because a typical arc welding setup may consist of several electrical circuits, it's critical to apply and maintain proper grounding methods within the welding area to promote electrical safety in the workplace.

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Head of her class

March 7, 2006

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At a time when it's becoming more and more difficult to find skilled workers, it's encouraging to read about people like 18-year-old Jessica Jelinski who are studying and pursuing careers in metalworking. Jelinski is putting her welding training to good use winning competitions and working on interesting projects.

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Guidelines for tungsten electrodes

March 7, 2006

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Choosing one of the six commonly available tungsten electrodes is a crucial first step in successful gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In addition, tip preparation is critical. The electrode choices are pure tungsten, 2 percent thoriated, 2 percent ceriated, 1.5 percent lanthanated, zirconiated, and rare earth. The end preparations are balled, pointed, and truncated.

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A tale of two welders

March 7, 2006

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George Bright and David Anthony were two welders with the same goal: to upgrade their GTAW system. Learn about their experiences and gain some insight into what you need to know to upgrade from an air-cooled to a water-cooled GTAW system.

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Up with energy prices and wind towers - Automation, consultation help plate fabricator meet demand for wind tower masts

February 7, 2006

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With the recent increases in gasoline and natural gas prices, more attention than ever is focused on alternative energy sources. One fabricator, Aerisyn LLC, investigated manufacturing towers for use in the wind power industry. To produce towers efficiently enough to compete against imports from Asia, Aerisyn relied on an equipment vendor that had experience in demanding fields such as aerospace, nuclear, and wind power.

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Hanging it up

February 7, 2006

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In his farewell article for thefabricator.com, reader-favorite author and welding instructor Marty Rice reflects on his life, his welding career, writing for the Web site, and his appreciation for the readers who have contacted him throughout the years. He also expresses his view about the decline of welding training programs.

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Elements of success:

January 10, 2006

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Torches, cables, and cooling are three integral components in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) equipment, and two cooling methods – air and water – are used in their cooling systems. Although GMAW and GTAW are different processes, the advantages and disadvantages of water- and air-cooled systems are the same. For that reason, you should consider similar factors when choosing a GMAW or GTAW system.

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Wading through the world of welding

January 10, 2006

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Two big tradeshows, Schweissen & Schneiden (Essen, Germany) and the FABTECH® International/AWS Welding Show (Chicago) highlighted several of the trends that have emerged in the welding industry during the last couple of years. Senior Editor Eric Lundin reviews many of the recent developments in arc and laser welding, and the growing use of another joining technology, adhesive bonding.

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The shocking truth about welding

December 13, 2005

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Welding instructor Marty Rice explains how welding power current works and how failing to follow safety practices can have shocking results. He also expands upon the information contained in "TIG welding—An overview"and discusses TIG qualities, applications, hazards, and the best way to learn TIG.

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Getting the needed fixtures

November 8, 2005

Woods Equipment Co. builds a variety of attachments and implements for agricultural, landscape, and construction vehicles. In a search to increase the productivity of its welding efforts amidst an ever-growing product line, the company discovered modular welding tables from Bluco Corp.

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TIG welding - an overview

October 11, 2005

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Welding instructor Marty Rice explains the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, more commonly known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding.

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No good deed goes unnoticed

September 13, 2005

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Being a good welder often means more than on-the-job performance. Whether it's volunteering to help others or otherwise giving back to one's community, these welders are examples of so many who take their time to give of themselves on the job — and outside the office.

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Resolving the challenges of welding coated steels

September 13, 2005

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The increased use of coated steels has resulted in an intensified search for solutions to the problems posed by joining these materials. High levels of spatter and welding fume, weld porosity, and poor bead shape are common. These problems lead to increased post-weld cleaning costs, reduced quality, greater rework, and an overall reduction in productivity. The right wire size and type, matched with the most appropriate shielding gas, can substantially improve gas metal arc welding (GMAW) performance on galvanized and coated steels.

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Welding rolled pipe in the 1G position efficiently

July 12, 2005

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For welding in the 1G position (in which the tube or pipe rotates), solid wire is traditional filler metal. However, metal-cored wire is making headway as an alternative. Metal-cored wire requires no land at the bevel, is more forgiving of welding dirty metal, produces less spatter, and allows travel speeds up to inches per minute.

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