Testing and Measuring Articles

Whether you need to measure dimensions or perform some sort of flaw detection on sheet, tube, or pipe, you'll find what you need in this technology area. It discusses measuring coordinates, diameters, and hardnesses; flaw detection using eddy current, ultrasonic, radiographic, and X-ray systems; and using a few other equipment types, such as vision systems and material composition analyzers.

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Electronic sensing device

Error-free tube fabrication

March 13, 2007

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Manufacturing processes are prone to variances, resulting in manufactured products that do not conform to specifications. Dozens of types of electronic sensors and measurement systems are available that fabricators can use to verify that their products are not defective. Understanding what types of sensors are available and how they work are the first two steps in implementing electronic sensing devices for quality control.

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Entering a new phase in weld inspection

October 3, 2006

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Reliable and consistent weld inspection is a significant part of any weld quality assurance program. One type of weld inspection used over the last several decades employs ultrasonics.

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Electromagnetic test methods for welded carbon steel tubing

July 11, 2006

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Although eddy-current testing is king in the tube production industry, flux leakage is worth a look. Using a small test sample, equipment-maker InspecTech found that for 3.50-in. to 4.00-in. carbon steel tubing with wall thickness from 0.056 in. to 0.100 in., the flux leakage method found more defects and turned out fewer false alarms than the eddy-current method did.

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A review of common nondestructive tests

June 13, 2006

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Five types of nondestructive testing are common for tube and pipe weld inspection, and each has advantages and disadvantages that may make one more suitable than another for your inspections.

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What do you monitor to ensure quality?

April 11, 2006

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Most manufacturers measure or test parts to verify that the parts meet quality standards. This conventional approach is time-consuming because testing adds steps and time to the production process. Furthermore, it is only as good as the sample size. A different approach to quality is to use a strain monitor to measure strain on the machine's frame. Comparing the strain with a reference (measured when the machine was known to be producing good parts) is a way to monitor the production process, and it doesn't require extra time or steps.

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Weld inspection before you weld

April 11, 2006

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Although it takes effort and time, procedure qualification testing can help you standardize your welding procedures and know what to expect when it comes to the quality of your manufactured parts.

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Positive ID

January 10, 2006

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Portable technology is available that can help fabricators positively identify the alloys used in a weldment. This is especially critical when a fabricator is trying to match a filler alloy to a base alloy and application.

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Random radiography

July 12, 2005

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Fabricators and contractors always should check to be sure that the extent of nondestructive examination and the acceptance criteria required are understood clearly by all parties and documented in writing.

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Fatigue Failures

June 14, 2005

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Fatigue causes the majority of mechanical element failures in structures and machinery. It is important to understand the causes of the failure and how to prevent or repair it.

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JD Power problem ratings

The problem with quality

July 10, 2003

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In May, automotive quality gurus J.D. Power & Associates released the results of its 2003 Initial Quality Study (IQS). As is the case every year, the winners will trumpet their scores while the losers will promise improvement. A closer look at the numbers, however, reveals some interesting observations.

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Do you use checking jigs and fixtures?

July 10, 2003

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How do you check tube fabrications to ensure they meet quality standards? Do you ship parts without checking them and hope that the next time the phone rings it isn't a prelude to a tirade from a disgruntled customer? Or do you check finished parts only to realize that your scrap rate is too high and wish you had checked them at earlier stages of the manufacturing process?

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Understanding weld discontinuities

June 12, 2003

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A welder's primary concern in any kind of work is ensuring his weld is sound. For this reason, it's important for an inspector examining the weld to be able to spot a variety of weld discontinuities, including:Porosity.Incomplete fusion.Incomplete joint penetration.Unacceptable weld...

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In-service weld defects, Repair, replace, or do nothing?

December 12, 2002

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Editor's Notes: In-service weld defects found in Australian refineries by an inspection team required assessment to determine the best course of action - repair, replace, or do nothing. This is the author's first-person account of the team's findings and solutions.The post-World War II period to...

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Quality as Part of the Contract

October 24, 2002

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Leaders who oversee weld designs, materials, methods, personnel training, and manufacturing teams should promote welding performance by addressing quality and testing issues in contracts for any work. Total quality systems and weld acceptance criteria must be specific--specified for each contract--and adherence must be enforced without wavering. Acceptance criteria for welding should be agreed to in a face-to-face meeting before fabrication begins. Before a project begins, all parties should agree on the retention time for inspection and test records—including X-rays, personnel qualifications and other project data--and the contract should state the location and description of the records storage facility.

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Aluminum bend test picture

Preparing, testing bend samples

September 26, 2002

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Bend tests for aluminum are different than for steel. For instance, lack of fusion discontinuities in aluminum usually don't show up as well in radiographs. A bend test is a more discriminating way to test your aluminum weld.

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