Consumables

The devil is in the details, especially when it comes to welding processes. This technology area has information on consumables, including cutting tips, electrodes and wire, spatter prevention compounds, temporary purge dams, and welding torch components.

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Consumables Corner: Pinning down the cause of porosity in SAW

June 23, 2014

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Q: Our company produces large structures fabricated from mild steel plate with a small amount of HSLA forgings ranging from 0.5 in. to 4 in. thick. Our main process is submerged arc welding (SAW) using a mild steel electrode and a neutral-bonded flux. We have been experiencing some issues with...

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Consumables Corner: Reducing weld cleanup in pulsed GMAW

June 20, 2014

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Q: Our company manufactures the main structures used to build fitness equipment. These structures are mild steel tubing of various shapes and sizes and in relatively thin material, typically 10 to 16 gauge. We are using 90 percent argon/10 percent CO2 shielding gas with a 0.035-in.-dia. ER70S-3...

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Brochure highlights long hand torches, accessories

June 19, 2014

Uniweld has published a brochure of its U.S.-made long torches, featuring V-, H-, and A-style torches and equipment. Also included are hand and machine cutting torches in a variety of lengths and styles and flashback...

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Consumables Corner: Eliminating porosity in submerged-arc welding

June 19, 2014

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Q: Our shop manufactures bridge and structural steel components. Most of the material is A36 or A572 and welded with E70X-X class electrodes using FCAW with 75 percent Ar/25 percent CO2 shielding gas (bottle-supplied) and SAW. We're having issues with porosity in our SAW process. We find that once...

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Brazing/heating tips available with more than 40 options

June 18, 2014

Uniweld offers the Hot Tips line of brazing and heating tips. More than 40 options are available for various application requirements. The line includes Cap’n Hook® tips, which provide 100 percent flame wraparound for even heat distribution in pipes and concentrated heat of up to 5,600...

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Flux-cored, gas-shielded electrode introduced

June 18, 2014

Select-Arc Inc. has introduced an E71T-1 flux-cored, gas-shielded electrode designed for weldability over a variety of parameters. Select 707 is an all-position wire for welding at low- or high-current settings that exhibits a smooth arc transfer and good arc stability, the company says. It...

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Consumables Corner: Longitudinal cracking: A check list for prevention

June 18, 2014

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Q: We are welding several fabricated parts made from A514 (T1) steel using an AWS A5.29, 3/32-in-dia. E110 FCAW electrode. On one particular part we are experiencing longitudinal weld cracking. The structure is a 4-in. plate with a square cut out of the center and a 1.5-in. plate welded back in its...

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Abicor Binzel receives 2013 Europe Frost & Sullivan Award for Product Leadership

June 17, 2014

Based on its recent analysis of the welding torches market, Frost & Sullivan has recognized Abicor Binzel, based in Buseck, Germany, with the 2013 Europe Frost & Sullivan Award for Product Leadership for Binzel’s advanced line of lighter-weight torches for manual welding. The air-cooled,...

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Consumables Corner: Addressing cracking on free-machining steels

June 17, 2014

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Q: We are a small company that fabricates and welds various parts and products for numerous companies. One of our customers is supplying us with parts for a particular weldment. All of the individual parts are made from A36 steel except for one, which is made from 12L14 steel. We are using GMAW...

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Consumables Corner: Identifying pockmarking causes in structural SAW

June 16, 2014

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Q: Our company manufactures various structural components, typically made from A36 or A572 steel grades in plate, I-beam, or channel. Based on the application we’ll use GMAW, FCAW, or SAW. On random occasions we experience pockmarking on the surface of the SAW joints. While the timing is usually...

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Consumables Corner: The thought process behind changing a weld process

June 13, 2014

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Q: Our company is using 0.045-in.-dia. mild steel solid wire for GMAW with 90 percent argon/10 percent CO2 shielding gas. A majority of our base metal is ¼ to 1 in. thick welded out of position about 30 percent of the time. We are considering a change in our welding process to reduce lead-times....

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Consumables Corner: Tackling root penetration problems

June 12, 2014

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Q: We are experiencing weld root penetration issues in our single- and multipass welds. Our base metal is A36, and we oxyfuel-cut it in thicknesses from ½ to 3 in. Most of the weld joints are standard T-joints with a few groove joints. We are using a 0.045-in.- dia. E71T-1C/M flux-cored wire with...

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Consumables Corner: Examining the root cause of distortion

June 11, 2014

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Q: We manufacture hydraulic cylinders. Ever since we changed our shielding gas blend, we’ve noticed a higher level of distortion. Before the change we used a 95/5 blend, but now we use 92/8, which we have documented using a 0.045-in.-dia. filler metal. Would the 92/8 blend run hotter and cause...

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Aluminum GMAW push-pull welding system targets truck trailer manufacturing

June 10, 2014

The POWER MIG® 350MP Trailer Manufacturing One-Pak™ from Lincoln Electric provides push-pull wire feeding capability for trailer manufacturing sheet metal applications. The multiprocess package includes a Magnum® PRO AL air-cooled, push-pull gun; aluminum drive roll kits; SuperGlaze 5356...

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Wire feeder designed for GMAW

June 10, 2014

EWM AG offers the drive 4X wire feeder for GMAW. Each wire feed roller is driven by its own cogwheel. The four cogwheels are interlocked with the drive shaft, causing the wire feed rollers to run synchronously. The driving shafts of the four wire feed rollers, which are 1.46 in. dia., are...

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