Metals/Materials Articles

The metals/materials technology area has information on the most commonly used materials in metal fabrication ̶ carbon steels; stainless steels; high-strength, low-alloy steels (HSLAs); and the 6000 series aluminum ̶ and those that aren't as common, such as the red metals, refractory metals, titanium, and magnesium.

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Introduction to advanced high-strength steels - Part II

September 13, 2005

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Understanding and compensating for the challenges associated with processing advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) can help you minimize springback, edge cracking, trimming, wrinkling, and die wear.

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Introduction to advanced high-strength steels - Part I

August 9, 2005

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Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) offer enhanced formability. This article discusses the properties and performance of various grades.

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The science of steel

August 9, 2005

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The spray form process is a new manufacturing technique that offers high alloyed tool steel with uniform carbide size and uniform carbide distribution. With less processing steps than P/M and properties better than ingot cast tool steel, SF is an option that offers nearly P/M performance with a cost closer to ingot casting.

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Is this Round 2?

May 10, 2005

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Forty years ago Ford and Ferrari were engaged in a fight-to-the-finish struggle to take top racing honors. Ford used its GT40 to snap Ferrari's six-time winning streak at the 24 Hours of LeMans, one of racing's most prestigious events. In 2003 the rivalry was back as Ford unveiled the high-performance GT, a niche car rich in aluminum and developed with the help of modern technologies such as superplastic forming (a.k.a. hot stamping) and friction stir welding.

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Challenges and considerations in joining exotic materials

November 9, 2004

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Every day Voss Aerospace faces challenges that vary as much as the materials its welders join and fabrication processes they use.

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Metallurgical aspects of tube production

May 4, 2004

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Small-diameter tubing plays a crucial role in many markets, including aerospace, nuclear, medical, and industrial. From coronary stents to hydraulic aircraft controls, each application has unique requirements. To meet the requirements of customers in these industries, well-designed processing steps and adequate control are critical.

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10 burning questions you asked about the steel price meltdown

May 4, 2004

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December came, and the Section 201 tariffs went out under the tide of global and World Trade Organization (WTO) pressure. Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water, material price increases hit the metals industry like a tidal wave that made the tariff increases look like gently lapping wading waves. "The Perfect Storm," it's been called.

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Welding's effect on strengthening steel

December 11, 2003

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Welding can severely influence strengthened or hardened metals, depending on the hardening technique used. Because of this, post-weld heat treatment is often very helpful in maintaining weld joint strength because it softens or tempers any martensite or bainite that formed in the HAZ.

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Making steels stronger

October 9, 2003

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When it comes to modifying a steel's strength and hardness, it's important to not confuse hardness with hardenability and remember that hardenability characteristics are important because they help identify how much a specific steel will harden during welding.

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Combating plate corrosion

October 9, 2003

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According to a recent study sponsored by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)1, with support from NACE International—The Corrosion Society, corrosion-related direct costs such as prevention methods and infrastructure repair and replacement make up 3.1 percent of the gross domestic...

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Carbon content, steel classifications, and alloy steels

August 28, 2003

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Steel classification is important in understanding what types are used in certain applications and which are used for others. For example, most commercial steels are classified into one of three groups: plain carbon, low-alloy, and high-alloy. Steel classification systems are set up and updated frequently for this type of information.

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Considering thermal processes for dissimilar metals

August 28, 2003

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Knowing how to weld dissimilar metals is becoming more and more important. One reason is that it's often impossible for one material to provide the optimum chemical, physical, and mechanical characteristics needed for an application. For this reason, as well as cost efficiency, technology specialists are experimenting with different joining processes to weld bimetal joints optimally.

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Phases, structures, and the influences of temperature

June 26, 2003

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When you heat or cool a piece of metal to a specific temperature, that metal goes through what's called a phase change, in which its crystal structure changes. Sometimes the change is obvious. For example, when a piece of metal melts, it goes through a phase change when the crystal structure breaks down and the metal goes from solid to liquid. When it solidifies it's also a phase change, as the structure re-forms from liquid to solid.

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Stretching metal's forming limits with HSP lubricants

June 12, 2003

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The trend in metal stamping is to use more and more aluminum and other lightweight materials, such as advanced high strength steel (AHSS). The need for technology to help improve metal flow of these materials in deep-drawing applications also is increasing. In many cases, a stamper's original...

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What's that material?

June 12, 2003

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Many alloys—stainless steels, HASTELLOY®, INCONEL®, INCOLOY®, MONEL®, duplex and superduplex alloys—are similar in appearance and easily mixed up after mill test reports (MTRs) and heat stamps are removed in material processing. These mix-ups can have serious consequences to the end user, including product rework, factory downtime, or premature product failure. A single mistake may cost hundreds of thousands of dollars in materials and labor to correct. In addition, any loss of consumer confidence resulting from shipping incorrect material carries incalculable costs.

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