Metals/Materials Articles

The metals/materials technology area has information on the most commonly used materials in metal fabrication ̶ carbon steels; stainless steels; high-strength, low-alloy steels (HSLAs); and the 6000 series aluminum ̶ and those that aren't as common, such as the red metals, refractory metals, titanium, and magnesium.

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Structured sheet metal - Part II

June 13, 2006

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Vault-structured sheet metal undergoes very little strain hardening during structuring, so it can be deformed further into shapes such as cans, containers, washing machine drums, thin-walled detector tubes, heat exchangers, and light reflectors.

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Measuring the plastic strain ratio of sheet metals

June 13, 2006

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Determining how much a metal can deform before thinning or fracture occurs is necessary for designing a reproducible forming operation. Testing the incoming sheet material is also essential because material properties may vary from coil to coil and affect the part quality and scrap rate. Understanding a material's plastic strain ratio and how to measure it are crucial in accurately establishing a material's formability.

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Warm forming titanium parts

June 13, 2006

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Senior Editor Eric Lundin visited a fabricator that specializes in aircraft components, M-DOT Aerospace, to learn how the company uses warm-forming of titanium to manufacture a cradle for an auxiliary power unit, or APU. Understanding titanium's characteristics is the key in forming this durable, corrosion-resistant, tough material.

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Structured sheet metal

June 13, 2006

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Editor's Note: This article is Part II of a two-part series discussing structured sheet metal and different structuring processes. Part I compares various structuring processes. This column was prepared by Michael Mirtsch and Ajay Yadav of the Engineering Research Center for Net Shape...

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Structured sheet metal - Part I

May 9, 2006

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Increasing sheet metal component rigidity while reducing weight can be achieved by substituting steel with aluminum, magnesium, or titanium alloys; advanced high-strength steel (AHSS); or 3-D structured sheet metal.

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Defining material specifications

May 9, 2006

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The root cause of splitting problems in deep-drawn parts often is that the process is not designed and engineered to accept the full range of mechanical properties within the ASTM specifications.

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Guidelines for forming high-strength material

April 11, 2006

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High-strength materials are becoming more common in stamping, especially for the aircraft and space industries. Although they all have their own specific features, they have some common characteristics and typical reactions to stretching and drawing.

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The benefits of materials engineering

October 11, 2005

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U.S. stampers are missing an opportunity to gain a competitive edge by offering materials engineering support, which often is lacking within OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers. Many stampers take the position that they "just build to a print"—but so do overseas shops.

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Introduction to advanced high-strength steels

September 13, 2005

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Part I of this two-part series presented an overview of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS). This article addresses issues encountered when processing these grades.Using AHSS in appropriate applications offers opportunities for reduced product weight, enhanced crash performance, manufacturing...

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Introduction to advanced high-strength steels - Part II

September 13, 2005

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Understanding and compensating for the challenges associated with processing advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) can help you minimize springback, edge cracking, trimming, wrinkling, and die wear.

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Introduction to advanced high-strength steels - Part I

August 9, 2005

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Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) offer enhanced formability. This article discusses the properties and performance of various grades.

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The science of steel

August 9, 2005

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The spray form process is a new manufacturing technique that offers high alloyed tool steel with uniform carbide size and uniform carbide distribution. With less processing steps than P/M and properties better than ingot cast tool steel, SF is an option that offers nearly P/M performance with a cost closer to ingot casting.

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Is this Round 2?

May 10, 2005

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Forty years ago Ford and Ferrari were engaged in a fight-to-the-finish struggle to take top racing honors. Ford used its GT40 to snap Ferrari's six-time winning streak at the 24 Hours of LeMans, one of racing's most prestigious events. In 2003 the rivalry was back as Ford unveiled the high-performance GT, a niche car rich in aluminum and developed with the help of modern technologies such as superplastic forming (a.k.a. hot stamping) and friction stir welding.

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Challenges and considerations in joining exotic materials

November 9, 2004

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Every day Voss Aerospace faces challenges that vary as much as the materials its welders join and fabrication processes they use.

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Metallurgical aspects of tube production

May 4, 2004

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Small-diameter tubing plays a crucial role in many markets, including aerospace, nuclear, medical, and industrial. From coronary stents to hydraulic aircraft controls, each application has unique requirements. To meet the requirements of customers in these industries, well-designed processing steps and adequate control are critical.

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