Stamping

Whether you're using a high-speed stamping press to make simple parts at breakneck speeds or doing something really tricky, like deep drawing a material that puts up a lot of resistance, the information in this technology area is sure to help. The articles, case studies, and press releases cover stamping presses, lubricants, and materials.

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Grip flow parts

Reducing Negative Tonnage

November 21, 2002

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Over time negative tonnage can cause significant press and die damage. Understanding the factors that influence the amount of negative tonnage can help you control it.

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Equipping Your Press With the Right Tonnage Monitor

November 15, 2002

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This article explains why it's useful to monitor press tonnage, the types of tonnage monitors available, the choices for mounting load sensors, calibrating a monitor, and options available for tonnage monitors.

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Precision Blanking System

Everything you need to know about flatteners and levelers for coil processing—Part 2

November 7, 2002

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Editor's Note: This article is Part II of a four-part series covering flatness and stability in cut-to-length, slitting, and tension leveling operations. This article discusses flattening solutions and the anatomy of a bend. Part I, which appeared in the October issue of The FABRICATOR®, discussed how flat-rolled metal gets unflat; Part III in the December issue will address how coil processors can make metal flat so it stays that way; and Part IV in the January 2003 issue will discuss new applications and options in leveling equipment.

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One step forming simulation

Taking advantage of simulation technology

October 24, 2002

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One of the most valuable high-tech tools introduced in the last decade has been finite element analysis (FEA) simulation software that stamping tool makers can use to test forming conditions and design dies in the virtual world. This reduces tooling and product design time and saves costs of prototyping and experimentation to find the right design. Training the tool designer or process engineer how to use simulation software can provide a quick ROI and improve the bottom line.

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Everything you need to know about flatteners and levelers for coil processing—Part 1

October 10, 2002

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This is article is part 1 of a four-part series covering flatness and stability in cut-to-length, slitting, and tension leveling operations. This article covers how flat rolled metal gets unflattened, including the 3 categories of defects, how defects are created at hot and cold mills, and how coil processors also create defects.

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Aluminum car design figure 1

Deep drawing aluminum—not as hard as it looks

October 10, 2002

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Keeping a couple key tips in mind can help you turn aluminum stamping from a source of frustration to a source of income and satisfaction in a hurry.

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Absolute Control: Implementing a master control system for hydraulic press lines

September 26, 2002

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Advanced master control systems in hydraulic press lines are designed to help achieve shorter changeover times, transparency of line operation, minimize personnel requirements, and increase productivity levels and uptime.

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Airless sprayed part figure 1

Tooling: Lube it or lose it

September 26, 2002

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Most metal forming operations use lubricants to protect the tooling and part from excessive wear caused by scuffing, scratching, scoring, welding, and galling. Four lubricant families are commonly used in pressworking, and thousands of formulations are available within each chemical family. The physical characteristics of the lubricant and metal forming operation involved determine the application method to be used.

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Take a break and learn to unwind

July 25, 2002

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The decoiling equipment you choose can make a difference down the line in pressroom operations. Here are some basic guidelines on coil cradles, pallet decoilers, and mandrel reels to make that decision easier.

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Creating finger tooling for three-axis transfer presses

July 25, 2002

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Designing finger tooling that will work effectively with a transfer press die is now easier with the advent of modular, off-the-shelf finger tooling components. Through computer-aided design, stampers can minimize trail-and-error adjustments and reconfigure finger tools or modify die components to make part transfer possible.

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Camber-free slitting for successful stamping

July 25, 2002

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For large volume parts runs, problems such as misfeeds, off-center hits and inadequate transfer webbing can cause slitting-induced strip camber. The production of camber-free slitting requires proper material selection, tooling, techniques and inspection practices.

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Wheel finishing machine

Reinventing the wheel - Chrome plater develops automated wheel polishing process

July 25, 2002

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Kuntz Electroplating, a Kitchener, Ontario-based independent OEM chrome-plating supplier of automotive wheels and bumpers, the management watched as hundreds of its workers manually polished its wheels. Because this made it difficult for the company to find, train, and retain the workers it needed, it decided to develop its own automated process for wheel finishing.

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Adding flexibility to stamping operations

June 27, 2002

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You're not afraid of automation. You already have automated several cells around high-volume parts. But now you have a new challenge: Integrate several large presses while still maintaining the flexibility to run lower-volume parts?

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Load monitor

Controlling stamping processes with statistical logic

June 27, 2002

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The output from a load monitor can be expressed using statistical language, such as X-bar, sigma, and Pareto charts, and histograms, to help stampers make decisions regarding their stamping processes.

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Komatsu Mechanical Press

Evolution of the beast

June 27, 2002

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This article outlines how mechanical presses are changing to meet a new marketplace. Stampers are adding extra stations to create a more complete part and stamping harder alloys. Servo-driven mechanical presses will make traditional flywheel presses obsolete because they use less energy and can be adjusted midstroke. Technological advances include real-time press monitoring, automatic die changes, and computerized troubleshooting.

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