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Psychology for the tool room

March 13, 2003

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As a consultant for the sheet metal stamping industry, I have had the opportunity to visit numerous stamping plants, die shops, and engineering facilities. One comment I often hear during these adventures is how arrogant or "know-it-all" some of the toolmakers or engineers are.

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Die designs for wide bends

March 13, 2003

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If you're a die designer, a standard precision progressive die can present countless challenges for you. Some of these dies have to produce thin slots, small holes, or tricky coins.

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Heating P91 boiler pipe

March 13, 2003

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In the power piping industry, turnaround time on a boiler pipe project typically is from 20 to 36 weeks. But J.F. Ahern Co. (JFA), Fond du Lac, Wis., a company ranked as one of the Midwest's top 10 mechanical contractors according to the May 2002 Contractor magazine, isn't typical. Neither were the results JFA achieved when it switched to induction technology for pipe preheating.

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Using precision abrasive wheel technology

March 13, 2003

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Precision abrasive wheel cutting is a small but important niche in the abrasive cutting field. It can be used to cut many types of parts, including metal rods, tubes, extruded shapes, and even wire. It is most useful in operations characterized by small parts, hard-to-cut materials, and tight tolerances.

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Coil joining criteria for tube and pipe mills

March 13, 2003

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A coil end joiner, shear welder, end welder, coil splicer, strip welder, shear and end welder, or butt welder—whatever you call it, it performs the same simple task coil after coil: It quickly shears strip ends, butts them, and provides a smooth ductile weld so that the newly joined coil can pass through a tube mill.

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Mechanized plasma cutting for HVAC applications

March 13, 2003

Just 20 years ago most heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) ductwork was cut by hand with snips and shears. Cutting out HVAC fittings was slow and labor-intensive. It took an experienced tinsmith with strong hands to slice through galvanized steel all day. It took even more skill to get the cuts and bends just right to coax flat panels of sheet metal into precise 3-D forms.

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H.L. Lyons Company

Folding technology opens doors for stainless steel appliance fabricator

March 13, 2003

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The H.L. Lyons Co., Louisville, Ky., began 40 years ago as an X-ray equipment company in the basement of Keith and Livingston Lyons parents' house. It later became a general metal fabricating business.

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Uncoiler Machine

Special slitting for specialty metals

March 13, 2003

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Many of today's consumer products, commercial and industrial processing machines, and automotive components are being exposed to continually higher temperatures and more severe corrosion.

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Does your tube travel more than you do?

February 27, 2003

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The level of technology used these days in the tube and pipe fabrication industry varies quite a bit in terms of age. Some of it is a bit antiquated, to put it kindly. Many tube fabrication shops use equipment that is more than 50 years old.

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Removing scrap efficiently during stamping

February 27, 2003

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Since the early days of metal stamping, removing scrap from stamping dies and presses has caused many headaches. Because scrap is not the primary product companies produce, it receives less attention than the finished products coming off the press.

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Don't lose your bearing!

February 27, 2003

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It's Monday morning after a long holiday weekend, and the first shift is starting with a bang. The slit coil supplier is late with your delivery, the second-shift maintenance person has called in sick, the mill operator is going to be late to work, and you wish you were still at the beach with the family.

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Laser system saves damaged military parts from the scrap heap

February 27, 2003

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At military installations across the country, repair personnel struggle to stretch the life spans of vital pieces of equipment. Sometimes welding can extend the life of damaged components in aircraft, tanks, and other military vehicles. But in some cases, high–temperature welding processes do more harm than good, warping and weakening delicate metal components. Previously such components would be classified as irreparable and replaced with pricey new parts.

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Advanced roll forming troubleshooting

February 27, 2003

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When troubleshooting a roll forming operation, you first need to make sure the roll form tooling is designed and built properly and will produce a quality product when all the conditions are correct.

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Choosing tungsten electrode type, size for aluminum GTAW

February 27, 2003

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I've heard different opinions about which size and type of tungsten electrode I should use to gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) aluminum. Could you clear up this subject for me?As you know, we use direct current electrode negative (DCEN), or straight polarity, to weld steels and stainless steels. For...

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It's all about why

February 27, 2003

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Talk about a can of worms ... From crystalline structures to phase diagrams and interstitial solutions, from microstructures to allotropic transformations, it sometimes seems that for every question metallurgy can answer, for every problem it can solve, it creates two more.

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