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Pinpointing future laser welding markets

October 23, 2003

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Aficionados of laser welding technology at times must feel a little like telephone vendors beamed back to 1603. They know almost everyone is going to use them in the future, but getting buy-in today can be like hawking loans at 25 percent-lots of interest and few takers.

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Shedding light on negativity—Part 1

October 9, 2003

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Read Part II. Are you a negaholic—someone who almost always sees the glass as half or totally empty? Do you live or work with one? If you answered, "No" to both of these questions, I'd like to know what planet you live on.These days—which are rife with economic uncertainty,...

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Promoting back safety—one company's approach

October 9, 2003

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Over the years, our midsize company, Aeroglide Corp., has used numerous methods to battle back injuries. We have tracked injuries in five-year increments and developed battle plans based on the trends we've observed.Dealing with InjuriesWe noticed that very few of the injuries were serious strains....

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Controlling bend angles

October 9, 2003

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Bend angles are among the most frustrating geometric features to control in metal stamping. This is due primarily to two factors – the inconsistency of the mechanical properties in the metal being bent and the die design.

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Making steels stronger

October 9, 2003

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When it comes to modifying a steel's strength and hardness, it's important to not confuse hardness with hardenability and remember that hardenability characteristics are important because they help identify how much a specific steel will harden during welding.

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Identifying the right cutting and welding tips

October 9, 2003

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The tip of a welding or cutting torch is where the action is (see Figure 1). Welding tips usually produce positive pressure (higher than 1 pound per square inch [PSI]) and are used at equal pressures of acetylene and oxygen. These single-hole copper-alloy tips are attached to a torch handle...

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Eliminating final trim shearing of hydroformed tube

October 9, 2003

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The most common way to establish tube length after hydroforming is by cutting or shearing the tube to a specified dimension; however, cutting out this step can reduce scrap. A new method designed to eliminate this step combines forming the end of a tube to resemble its final form with using a hydroform die to correct end position variations off the bender. While this approach eliminates the final shear trim operation, it also presents new challenges.

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Using finite element analysis to roll-form tubes

October 9, 2003

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Roll forming is a common method for producing steel tubes. It is a continuous process in which a strip is guided through several sets of rolls that form the strip into the desired shape. After the final shape is achieved, tube edges are welded together to form a closed section. After the welding operation, the tube is sized through another set of rolls to obtain the required diameter.

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A survey of presses for hydroforming tubes, extrusions

October 9, 2003

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Hydroforming is one of the most important fields in production manufacturing. In recent years many single presses, groups of presses, and entire production plants for internal high-pressure (IHP) hydroforming of tubes and extrusions have been installed, especially in the Americas and in Europe. The driving force behind this development has been the efficient production of automotive parts.

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Predicting springback in air bending, straight flanging

October 9, 2003

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Editor's Note: This column was prepared by the staff of the Engineering Research Center for Net Shape Manufacturing (ERC/ NSM), The Ohio State University, Professor Taylan Altan, director.Air bending and straight flanging are the most prevalent types of bending in sheet metal forming. Predicting...

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Investing in lubricants

October 9, 2003

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All businesses tied to the metal forming industry are scrambling to find areas in which they can lower costs without sacrificing quality. Adding to this burden are a tight cash flow and a lack of financial resources to invest in process improvement equipment. Therefore, the savings must come from doing more with less.

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Band sawing bundled shapes

October 9, 2003

Bundled side by side or top to bottom, thin-walled structural metal shapes pose a productivity dilemma for sawing shops. Band saw efficiency typically is measured in cubic inches of stock removed per minute, and the most efficient cuts are those made in large, solid pieces.

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Selecting the best lens for welders' eye protection

October 9, 2003

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In the industrial environment, safety glasses are a necessity for jobs that put employees' eyes at risk of exposure to heat, impact, chemicals, or dust. But workers also need protection from nonimpact dangers, such as radiant energy, eye strain, and fatigue. So choosing the appropriate lens or filter plate for your workers' eye protection is just as important in preventing eye injury as is selecting the appropriate style of safety eyewear.

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Combating plate corrosion

October 9, 2003

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According to a recent study sponsored by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)1, with support from NACE International—The Corrosion Society, corrosion-related direct costs such as prevention methods and infrastructure repair and replacement make up 3.1 percent of the gross domestic...

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Camp Manufacturing

October 1, 2003

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Ah, the memories of summer camp. Swimming, sunscreen, hiking, bug spray, camping, arts and crafts. And the promise of an exciting experience with friends. Like youths all over the U.S., 10 students from the Rockford, Ill., region have their own summer camp recollections. Theirs are from a one-week experience the last week of July, but it wasn't necessarily like the camp you may remember.

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