Tube and Pipe Fabrication Articles

The tube and pipe fabrication technology area covers sawing (band, circular, and friction) and other cutting processes, such as abrasive, flame, laser, oxyfuel, plasma, and waterjet. It also discusses forming processes, including bending and end forming. Finally, it includes a handful of miscellaneous processes, such as trimming, beveling, finning, grooving, threading, and spinning.

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Cutting to the chase - Integrating secondary operations

January 10, 2006

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Tube cut-off machines have evolved to integrate end forming and bending capabilities that normally are considered secondary operations. The suitability of a cutting method to be integrated inline with end forming and bending depends on each cutting method’s characteristics and the bending and end forming requirements.

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Meeting the challenges of modern architecture

December 13, 2005

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Today's architects develop designs and concepts that push past the boundaries of yesterday. Fabricators are faced with a sometimes daunting challenge to make unusual components to assist architects in completing unusual buildings, to the extent that they sometimes have to rely on themselves to develop new equipment and processes.

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Tube-bend tooling: square-back wiper dies or wiper inserts?

November 8, 2005

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Wiper dies are a fundamental requirement in modern tube bending applications in which tubes are bent at increasingly tight bend radii with increasingly thinner wall thicknesses. The design of the wiper die plays a key role in its performance and durability, as does its manufacturing method and the material from which it has been constructed.

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Improving welded joint structure, properties in oil and gas pipelines

October 12, 2005

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The welding process and ambient temperature affect the structure and mechanical properties of welded joints in large-diameter (1,420 mm) pipes of manganese low-alloy steels, which are used commonly in oil and gas pipelines. Pulsed welding can improve the homogeneity of the structure and reduce the grain size of metal of the weld and HAZ zones. The ambient temperature causes structural changes, which affect the ductility and impact toughness in the welded joint zones. Temperature plays a role. Research shows that welding at 20 degrees C leads to an increase in ductility and impact toughness of 8 percent to 27 percent, and welding at -60 degrees C leads to an increase of 15 percent to 24 percent.

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Trends for stainless steel tube in automotive applications

September 13, 2005

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Evidence that stainless steel has potential as a material for automotive components—for its high strength-to-weight ratio for overall weight reduction, good dent performance, corrosion resistance, and formability—was presented by ISSF members at the SAE International™ 2004 SAE World Congress, in Detroit.

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9 Questions About Annular Cutting

September 13, 2005

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One way to avoid dimpling and deburring while making holes in tube and pipe is use annular cutters. Because annular cutters are hollow, there is no dead-zone resistance to overcome. Knowing how to use an annular cutter and what to watch for can help avoid problems and extend tool wear.

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Recreational tube cutting

August 9, 2005

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In the 1990s, Polaris Industries Inc. realized it needed to rethink the way tube fabricating was done at its Osceola, Wis., facility. Laser tube cutting proved to be the answer.

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Welding zirconium and zirconium alloys Part II

April 11, 2005

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Editor's Note: This is the second installment of a three-part series on welding zirconium. Part I addresses metallurgy, weld preparation, and shielding techniques. Part II covers welding technique. Part III discusses additional methods of joining refractory metals.

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Managing rotary-draw tube bending

March 8, 2005

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Editor's Note: This article is adapted from a conference presentation made by the author at a previous TPJ Symposium.

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Welding zirconium and zirconium alloys Part III

January 10, 2005

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Editor's Note: This is the third installment of a three-part series on welding zirconium. Part I addresses metallurgy, weld preparation, and shielding techniques. Part II covers welding technique. Part III discusses additional methods of joining refractory metals.

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Welding zirconium and zirconium alloys

January 10, 2005

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Editor's Note: This is the first installment of a three-part series on welding zirconium. Part I addresses metallurgy, weld preparation, and shielding techniques. Part II, which will appear in the October/November issue, will cover welding technique. Part III, which will appear in the December issue, will discuss additional methods of joining refractory metals.

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Selecting a tube cutting process

November 9, 2004

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Tube fabricators use a variety of methods—sawing, lathe cutting, rotary cutting, supported shear cutting, dual-blade shear cutting, and laser cutting—to cut tubing from mill lengths into shorter pieces for use in final fabrication. No single method is optimal for cutting the broad range of tubular materials and tubular shapes produced by this industry.

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Welding zirconium and zirconium alloys Part I

October 12, 2004

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Editor's Note: This is the first installment of a three-part series on welding zirconium. Part I addresses metallurgy, weld preparation, and shielding techniques. Part II covers welding technique. Part III discusses additional methods of joining refractory metals.

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Thinking about an equipment upgrade?

September 14, 2004

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Products change, and so do manufacturing methods used to make products. In the tube and pipe industry, however, manufacturing changes have been few and infrequent over the past few decades.

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Lean times call for mean tactics—Part 1

September 14, 2004

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Ron Stange looks back on his 50 years in the tube-bending industry and provides his insight on the one thing tube bender operators must know to be successful: Ironclad rules for successful bending do not exist. Tube bender operators must start with guidelines and incorporate their own experience to be successful.

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