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Pulling taffy and producing tube

December 11, 2003

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Do you remember going to the county fair and watching candy makers make taffy? As a child I often would watch the whirling motion of the taffy pull machine as it whipped and pulled and whipped and pulled again and again until the candy was the right consistency, texture, and color. As long as the...

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Selecting a welding frequency

December 11, 2003

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Early power supplies for contact and induction welding for tube production, which were introduced in the 1950s, operated at 300 to 400 kHz. Modern power supplied, introduced in the 1990s, are variable from 200 to 400 kHz. While using any frequency in this range can produce acceptable welds for most applications, finite element analysis can be helpful for finding the optimal frequency for a particular gauge and material.

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Folding technology makes sweeping changes

December 11, 2003

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Schwenkbiegemachinen, or swing bending machines, have been in use for more than 200 years. European manufacturers began to power them with electrical or hydraulic power after World War II, when an enormous amount of sheet metal was used in the reconstruction of Europe.

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Reflection—Getting the most from experience

November 20, 2003

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Leaders, what have you learned about yourself, your employees, and your company in the past year? What were your business blessings? What did you learn about your leadership style or methods? What do you intend to take into the new year, and what will you leave behind?

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Workers' compensation—Managing the process

November 20, 2003

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Editor's note: Portions of this article were published previously in an issue of FMA/TPA "Member Connections."State workers' compensation laws were enacted to ensure that covered employees who are injured on the job are provided with monetary benefits to cover medical expenses and to replace...

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The history of welding according to Marty

November 20, 2003

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This is a welding history synopsis, as seen by me. If you are a history or English professor, you might want to stop reading at this point; it ain't gonna be pretty.

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Tips to follow before you start beveling

November 20, 2003

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Choosing the right grinder is always important. Size, weight, durability, and a few specific features can play a big part in working efficiently. Before starting your next beveling project, use the following tips on grinder and wheel selection to make sure you're as productive as possible.

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Exercising control

November 20, 2003

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This three-phase, mid-frequency inverter is a dual-gun projection welding machine with a pneumatically operated lift table for the workpiece. Although mid-frequency technology isn't new, North American buyers are increasingly turning toward their benefits, equipmentmakers say.Getting control over...

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Cool your torch

November 20, 2003

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Your car engine's water-cooling system has a lot in common with the cooling system in your plasma cutter: Both use water and coolant, a pump, cooling hoses, and a heat exchanger to remove energy from a heat source.

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Handling appliance steel

November 20, 2003

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Savvy stampers are purchasing new equipment or modifying and retrofitting existing equipment to include prefinished materials features. By paying close attention to equipment, tension practices, material processing methods, and material handling, stampers can participate in the market for surface-sensitive materials.

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Laser tube processing

November 20, 2003

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The introduction of lasers to the manufacturing process has changed the fabrication of tubing. Today, many manual processes can be replaced with laser processing techniques. Using the flexibility afforded by lasers, a bundle of raw tubing can be loaded into a laser tube cutter; parts can be cut with high accuracy, quality, and speed; and then finished parts from the machine can be sent directly to the final assembly.

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Zero to sixty in the blink of an eye

November 20, 2003

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The engine roars to life, and Bruce Van Sant inches the motorcycle forward, stopping about 25 feet from the starting line. Alan Geetings, crew member of the Van Sant racing team, sprays the asphalt with water. Bruce revs up the engine. The engine's torque breaks the rear tire's grip on the asphalt and it spins furiously. The air is suddenly filled with a cloud of smoke and the smell of burning rubber. After heating the tire, Bruce approaches the starting line.

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Shipyard uses laser-GMAW hybrid welding to achieve one-sided welding

November 20, 2003

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The Jos. L. Meyer GmbH shipyard in Papenburg, Germany, built its first wooden sailing ship in 1795. Today the six-generation, family-owned shipbuilding company designs and builds large metal cruise liners, gas tankers, and ferryboats. These floating behemoths can be as large as 162.5 by 975 feet (50 by 300 meters), and 162.5 ft. (50 m) high.

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Improving bending operations

November 20, 2003

The Ottenweller Company Inc. is a heavy sheet fabricator that produces fabrications and assemblies for construction and agricultural equipment manufacturers and heavy-duty truck builders. The family-owned business employs 150 and operates from a 120,000-square-foot facility in Fort Wayne, Ind.

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Six-axis tube laser adds new dimension to job shop

November 20, 2003

Since its founding in 1988 as a stamping job shop, the Kooima Co.'s equipment and services have evolved to meet the changing demands of its customers—always with the goal of providing them with one-stop shopping for all their primary metal fabricating needs.

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