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Resolve to have a healthy, injury-free 2004

January 13, 2004

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The beginning of a new year is a good time to think about what's important in life and what changes you can make to benefit yourself and those around you. Safety practices and good health should be on everyone's priority lists. Adopting certain behaviors will help optimize your health, ensure your safety in the workplace and elsewhere, and make your corner of the world better for everyone.

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Made in the U.S.A.

January 13, 2004

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For many years I lived in Belvidere, Ill., home of what was then known simply as the Chrysler plant. The local United Auto Workers union prominently displayed a sign in the parking lot that said, "Foreign cars will be towed." Now that the plant, which builds the Dodge Neon®, bears the name DaimlerChrysler, I'm wondering—is the sign still there? Probably not.

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New Year's Resolutions

January 13, 2004

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What are your resolutions for 2004? "I'm going to lose that extra 15 pounds." "I plan to exercise more this year." "I'm going to be more complimentary to my staff." "I'm going to be more patient." Or, did you remember the resolutions you didn't keep last year and ask yourself, "Why make resolutions? I won't keep them once I get back to the daily grind."

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The future of structural welding

January 13, 2004

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Like my history of welding article, this article is my small insight into the future of structural welding. Like I said before, if you are a history or English professor—and I'll add math professor to this group after my last miscalculation, pointed out by Ted Neff from Reynolds...

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Improving waterjet cutting precision by eliminating taper

January 13, 2004

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The balance between waterjet cutting production rate and part precision always has been difficult to achieve because of the jet's complex behavior. Because its shape at any point along the tool path is a result of multiple independent variables — including the speed and acceleration with...

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One system does not fit all

January 13, 2004

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Ventilation systems come in a variety of types for different types of welding processes and varying fabrication facility setups. The emphasis on proper application of these systems and best use of the components used in them comes from an increased interest in cleaner air for the welder.

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Rolling bolsters bolster productivity

January 13, 2004

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To thrive and experience growth and healthy profits, a stamping company must have systems in place that allow flexible manufacturing and minimize press downtime. Changing from one job to the next in the least amount of time possible is one of the primary factors impacting productivity and a company's ability to adjust to the changing needs of customers quickly and efficiently.

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Troubleshooting compression bending

January 13, 2004

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You can achieve nearly trouble-free bending by being aware of the causes of typical compression bending problems and by correctly operating and maintaining the compression bender. Most compression bending problems are one of three types:Flattening or collapsing on the outside of the bend.Crimping...

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Appliancemaker reduces downtime with stamping press feed system

January 13, 2004

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The Whirlpool Co. builds refrigerators at its facility in Fort Smith, Ark. The company stamps the appliance parts—large and small, galvanized, cold-rolled, and aluminum—on approximately 35 presses. The majority of its stamping presses are straight-side machines, although some are open-back inclinable (OBI), and a few are hydraulic.

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Producing side-impact profiles

January 13, 2004

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The ramming machine bores into the side of the new automobile at a speed of 50 kilometers (31 miles) per hour. Within a fraction of a second, sensors situated all over the test dummy signal details of the stress load. Shortly afterward the overall results of the Euro-NCAP crash test will appear in all the specialized automobile magazines.

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Beating 'world' pricing

January 13, 2004

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During the depths of the manufacturing slowdown that has cost the fabricated metal products sector nearly 300,000 jobs since 2000, Steven Southwell, president of Des Plaines, Ill.-based Nu-Way Industries Inc., faced a depressing challenge from one of his multinational OEM customers??either meet the ??total cost of acquisition? achieved in China or purchase the part from the Chinese supplier, inventory it, and incorporate it into the family of parts supplied by Nu-Way.

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Structural tube on campus

January 13, 2004

Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Wash., is known for its strong science programs. "Flying Bridge," a structure designed by artist and sculptor Ed Carpenter, physically and metaphorically spans the biology and chemistry departments in the university's new Dean Science Building. Carpenter, who designed the bridge with engineering consultation from Peterson Structural Engineers Inc., teamed up with Albina Pipe Bending Co. Inc. to tackle the project's material bending and fabrication requirements.

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Taking tubular aluminum scaffolding to new heights

December 11, 2003

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For the company that broke the world record for building the tallest freestanding structure with a 320-foot scaffolding (the Statue of Liberty restoration project in 1984, see Sidebarat bottom of page)designing and constructing the scaffolding for the Washington Monument restoration project was just a natural next step.

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Family business going strong after 100 years

December 11, 2003

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The average lifespan of a family-owned business is 24 years, and 60 percent of family-owned businesses do not have a clear succession plan. Tell that to the Peddinghaus Corporation and you might be in for a big "Oh really?" In business for 100 years and with a Peddinghaus still at the helm, the family-owned manufacturer of steel construction industry equipment clearly is a statistical exception.

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Selecting a stamping die pressure system, Part I

December 11, 2003

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This article is part one of a two-part series that focuses on the different stamping die pressure systems available, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. The article also discusses some of the controlling factors that contribute to system selection.

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