ASMA LLC

Steve Benson

President
ASMA LLC
2952 Doaks Ferry Road N.W.
Salem, OR 97301-4468


Phone: 503-399-7514
fax: 503-399-7514
www.asmachronicle.com
Contact via email
Steve Benson, a member and former chair of FMA's Precision Sheet Metal Technology Council, is the president of Asma LLC.

Die width selection

July 24, 2003

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Most designers and engineers usually place very little importance on achieving the correct inside radius of a formed part. Why? Because the functionality of the part is unaffected if the specified inside radius is 0.062 in. and actual measured inside radius is 0.078 in. So why do we care about...

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Managers are not necessarily leaders

June 26, 2003

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Often we are told that leadership is the key to the success of any business or organization. What is leadership? Is it the same as management? And what separates would-be or so-so leaders from world-class leaders?

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Making your own punch and dies

May 29, 2003

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How many times have you looked through huge piles of blueprints for a prototype part or short-run job and thought, "If only I had that tool, this job would be a piece of cake?"

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Gauging difficult parts at the press brake

March 27, 2003

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Gone are the days when engineers and draftsmen slaved for hours over drafting boards with a pencil and slide rule in hand (does anyone remember slide rules?). Today we've moved beyond slide rules and even beyond hand-held calculators to personal computers and mainframes to do much, if not all, of our design work. CAD and CAM software has made this possible.

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How air forming works

February 13, 2003

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Air forming began its rise in popularity during the mid- to late 1970s, becoming the most prevalent method of forming on a press brake.

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But we have always done it this way

December 12, 2002

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Some of the following story may seem somewhat strange for an article about precision sheet metal and press brake operation, but my hope is that by reading this article, you will find that history can shed some light into a few of the darker corners of press brake and press brake department...

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Shop employee image

What the? This can't be done!

October 24, 2002

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Carefully planning the forming order can make even the most daunting project less complicated and problematic.

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Un-balanced tooling diagram figure 1

Can I form a box that deep?

July 11, 2002

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There's no reason you can't form sharp, deep boxes with a press brake consistently. You just have to be familiar with what your tooling can and can't do under certain circumstances.

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Using benchmarking for bend deductions

May 30, 2002

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Benchmarking is a very good idea for your operation ... just make sure your benchmarks are your own.

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Bumping up large-radius bends

May 30, 2002

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The step-bending method can be a good way to achieve large radii without having to spend huge sums of money on special tooling.

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Sheet metal bending diagram

Reviewing bottom bending and nested parts

April 15, 2002

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Looking to nest parts tightly, but can't win the battle against the material's natural grain? Take heart—bottom bending could be your key to success.

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Press Brakes and (much) More

January 31, 2002

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The flow of product through you shop is a key issue in determining your prosperity as a business. Drawing a little insight from the Chinese concept of feng shui might help you achieve the kind of flow you're looking for.

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Mobilizing equipment-saving time and talent

November 29, 2001

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It's hard to believe that machines such as press brakes and hardware-setting equipment can move around on wheels or be moved by forklift and still function correctly. But I can tell you from experience that it is true and can be done.

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Fighting springback in profound radius bends

September 17, 2001

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When bending sheet metal, three terms apply to the radius of the bend: sharp, radius, and profound. A sharp bend has a radius less than 63 percent of the material thickness. A radius bend has a radius between 63 percent and 10 times the material thickness. A profound radius exceeds 10 times the material thickness and an entirely new set of rules apply. This article presents those rules.

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Bend deduction charts

July 26, 2001

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Quite often I am asked, "Where can I get a bend deduction chart that works, one with valid numbers?" That's a good question.

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