Gary Morphy

Project Engineer
Excella Technologies
425 Hespeler Rd
Suite 521
Cambridge, ON N1R 8J6
Canada


Phone: (519) 772 - 5748 x101
Contact via email
Tube hydroforming

The evolution of tube hydroforming

June 12, 2007

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More than a decade ago, tube hydroforming grew in two directions: low-pressure hydroforming (a patented process) and high-pressure hydroforming. Since then the industry has grown to include all manner of robots, laser cutting systems, punching operations, and so on. Manufacturing consultant Gary Morphy takes us through about two decades of trends and developments and sheds some light on the future of this industry.

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The evolution of tube hydroforming

October 10, 2006

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The growth in hydroforming use has slowed as tube hydroformers, particularly in the automotive industry, are taking a step back to examine process options in an effort to determine the most efficient, cost-effective process. Some even have reverted to stamping and welding formerly hydroformed parts. This article explains how the industry got to this point and where it's headed.

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Introduction to Tube Hydroforming

June 13, 2006

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Under the right circumstances, hydroforming can be a viable, cost-effective manufacturing process. Tube hydroforming often produces stronger structural components than can be achieved with more conventional methods. This article explains tube hydroforming, describes its evolution, and discusses the factors that should be considered when deciding whether to use the process.

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Part feature developments in hydroforming products

March 25, 2004

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Tube hydroforming technology continues to develop in ways that improve part utility, economy, or process robustness. Auto parts that have recently been produced by hydroforming include roof rails, radiator enclosures, a front-end structural module, and roof rails.

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Pressure-sequence and high-pressure hydroforming: Knowing the processes can mean boosting profits

February 19, 2001

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Pressure-sequence hydroforming can form complex parts as well as forming most ductile metals, including high-strength, low-alloy, and stainless steels with sharper corners, thick-walled tube, and other difficult features.

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