Practical Welding Today®

September/October 2005

Practical Welding Today® was created to fill a void in the industry for hands-on information, real-world applications, and down-to-earth advice for welders. No other welding magazine fills the need for this kind of practical information. Subscriptions are free to qualified welding professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the September/October 2005 issue available online:

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Aluminum Workshop

May 8, 2007

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I have a fabrication project involving 5454 aluminum plate, and I was told to weld this alloy using 5183 filler wire. Is this correct?

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Waste replaced

October 11, 2005

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If your welding shop hasn't implemented lean manufacturing initiatives, it's only a matter of time, the experts say. Learn and brush up on your understanding of lean manufacturing to see what tools might help boost your productivity and efficiency.

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Keys to success in laser welding

September 13, 2005

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Although a firm grasp of laser physics, metallurgy, tooling and fixturing, weld process parameters, and part strength testing is necessary to implement laser technology in any manufacturing facility, it's also critical to think of other issues that will impact the success of your laser use. Some keys to a successful laser project include involving production personnel early in the process, choosing a laser technology advocate, considering your shop's ambient environment, using trained operators and maintenance personnel, and planning for spare parts and maintenance.

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Safety: The burning issue in oxyfuel torch use

September 13, 2005

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While flashback arrestors help prevent backfires and flashbacks in oxyfuel torches, no device replaces the necessity for safe operating practices and properly maintained oxyfuel torch equipment.

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Get your schedule in order

September 13, 2005

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The quality of resistance-welded components depends on the weld schedule, which comprises several machine settings. Although many resistance welding machine and electrode suppliers offer standard weld schedules for common metal combination, special weld schedules often are necessary to address increased use of special metals, joint combinations, coatings, and weld-through sealants and adhesives.

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