Practical Welding Today®

September/October 2006

Practical Welding Today® was created to fill a void in the industry for hands-on information, real-world applications, and down-to-earth advice for welders. No other welding magazine fills the need for this kind of practical information. Subscriptions are free to qualified welding professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the September/October 2006 issue available online:

Entering a new phase in weld inspection

October 3, 2006

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Reliable and consistent weld inspection is a significant part of any weld quality assurance program. One type of weld inspection used over the last several decades employs ultrasonics.

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Which filler wire is best for welding 6061-T6 aluminum, 5356 or 4043?

October 3, 2006

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Both are acceptable for welding 6061-T6, but each has advantages and disadvantages depending on the application.An aluminum alloy containing 5 percent magnesium, 5356 generally is stronger and more ductile than 4043. But 4043, which contains 5 percent silicon, typically flows better, is more...

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Fuel your safety knowledge

October 3, 2006

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The subject of oxyfuel safety is vast and would take volumes to cover completely. In fact, most large companies involved in oxyfuel cutting and welding publish their own procedural guidelines for employees to follow.

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Improve your GTAW in 3 steps

September 12, 2006

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Once you know some basic information about the equipment on the front of your GTAW torch, you can get the right parts for your application and start improving your welding performance.

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Bridging the challenges

September 12, 2006

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A good design doesn't guarantee challenge-free fabrication in the bridge industry, as one fabricator found out. Despite material availability obstacles, stringent welding requirements, and massive pipe cutting needs, Stinger Welding and the design team it worked with pulled off a winning pipe bridge design in six months.

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