STAMPING Journal®

May 2006

STAMPING Journal® is the only industrial publication dedicated solely to serving the needs of the metal stamping market. In 1987 the American Metal Stamping Association broadened its horizons and renamed itself and its publication, known then as Metal Stamping. Print subscriptions are free to qualified stamping professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the May 2006 issue available online:

Structured sheet metal

June 13, 2006

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Editor's Note: This article is Part II of a two-part series discussing structured sheet metal and different structuring processes. Part I compares various structuring processes. This column was prepared by Michael Mirtsch and Ajay Yadav of the Engineering Research Center for Net Shape...

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Structured sheet metal - Part I

May 9, 2006

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Increasing sheet metal component rigidity while reducing weight can be achieved by substituting steel with aluminum, magnesium, or titanium alloys; advanced high-strength steel (AHSS); or 3-D structured sheet metal.

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Defining material specifications

May 9, 2006

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The root cause of splitting problems in deep-drawn parts often is that the process is not designed and engineered to accept the full range of mechanical properties within the ASTM specifications.

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green tree and green grass

Race to be green

May 9, 2006

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Automakers are racing to introduce green technologies. Toyota is the leader in hybrid sales and plans to introduce two new models even though it will continue to lose money in the short and medium term. Instead of trying to outsell Toyota, GM has introduced flexible-fuel vehicles that run on E-85, an ethanol and gasoline mix.

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Do you need a die transport system?

May 9, 2006

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A die transport system may be needed if current production requirements cannot be met with existing presses, and opportunities for additional contracts are limited by current equipment production volumes; parts can be produced competitively in large batches, but not if the part count is smaller; and shop safety needs to be improved.

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Handling engineering changes in automotive parts

May 9, 2006

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Control of engineering changes for automotive components and assemblies requires cooperation and communication among groups within a company, as well as with outside suppliers. Changes must be initiated, communicated, implemented, and verified enterprisewide.

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