STAMPING Journal®

September 2006

STAMPING Journal® is the only industrial publication dedicated solely to serving the needs of the metal stamping market. In 1987 the American Metal Stamping Association broadened its horizons and renamed itself and its publication, known then as Metal Stamping. Print subscriptions are free to qualified stamping professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the September 2006 issue available online:

BHF-chart

Multipoint-control die cushion systems for stamping complex parts

November 7, 2006

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In deep drawing of complex, asymmetrical parts such as stainless steel kitchen sinks, blank holder force (BHF) needs to be controlled locally to regulate the flow of the sheet metal. An MPC blank holder system allows this control by placing individually programmable cushion pins around the blank perimeter, with an appropriate BHF selected at each pin location.

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Die Basics 101

October 10, 2006

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Editor's Note: "Die Basics 101" is a 17-part article.

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Setting up progressive dies - Part I

October 3, 2006

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Editor's Note: "Setting Up Progressive Dies" is a two-part article. Part I discusses press and die cleanness, die alignment, clamping procedures, and preliminary shut height calibration. Part II discusses the process for getting metal into the die, setting the pitch, feed release, and other factors...

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Draw forming, Part IV

September 12, 2006

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The relationships among part geometry, tool geometry, and control of the processing inputs are significantly different between the net shape and non-net shape processes.

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Doing its level best

September 12, 2006

A precision roller leveler, installed between the coil payoff reel and the press equipment, allows an operator to stretch the edges when necessary to compensate for loose centers or stretch the center to compensate for loose edges before the blanking operation.

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New forms for modern autobody stamping

September 12, 2006

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With the introduction of stronger safety legislation and increased fuel prices, auto manufacturers must respond with higher car body stiffness for safety and lower body weight for fuel efficiency. The fields of materials development, engineering, and manufacturing are working together to achieve autobody weight reduction with improved crash characteristics.

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