STAMPING Journal®

November 2006

STAMPING Journal® is the only industrial publication dedicated solely to serving the needs of the metal stamping market. In 1987 the American Metal Stamping Association broadened its horizons and renamed itself and its publication, known then as Metal Stamping. Print subscriptions are free to qualified stamping professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the November 2006 issue available online:

Lathe turning diagram

Draw forming, Part V

November 7, 2006

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The remoteness of the energy-affecting elements contributes to the differences between the net shape and non-net shape processes. This additional difference helps drive the nature of the net-shape processing theory.

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BHF-chart

Multipoint-control die cushion systems for stamping complex parts - Part III

November 7, 2006

With constant BHF, conventional steel sheets can be formed with few tryouts. However, with the increasing use of lightweight materials and high-strength steels with low formability, there is a need for precise, localized control of metal flow using MPC systems.

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Material handling stampings

Moving material efficiently

November 7, 2006

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It's a challenge to select the most efficient conveyor for a particular application. To make the best choice, it's imperative that all operating parameters be considered.

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stamping die change

10 common quick die change problems

November 7, 2006

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Die changeover is one of the few times when a press isn't making money. Why do some die changeovers take hours? It might be the press, operator, die, material, lift truck, crane, or the tools.

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Designing dies 2-D or 3-D?

November 7, 2006

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Both 2-D and 3-D die design packages have advantages and disadvantages, which are discussed here, but true success lies in the designer's ability, not the software's.

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Drawing on new experiences

October 10, 2006

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In the past metal forming in the appliance industry meant giant presses with expensive tooling. Lead-times were forever, and change didn't come easy. Whirlpool Corp. in Fort Smith, Ark., is taking a new approach to metal forming, and flexible technologies are the key.

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