STAMPING Journal®

June 2008

STAMPING Journal® is the only industrial publication dedicated solely to serving the needs of the metal stamping market. In 1987 the American Metal Stamping Association broadened its horizons and renamed itself and its publication, known then as Metal Stamping. Print subscriptions are free to qualified stamping professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the June 2008 issue available online:

Kaikaku pie chart

Automotive toolmaking tricknology : Applying NUMMI's concepts to tool and diemaking

June 17, 2008

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In 1984 the Fremont, Calif. GM assembly plant shuttered under the strain of horrible management-labor relationships. Toyota offered to reopen the plant in a joint venture with GM implementing its Toyota Production System. Tool and diemaking shops can apply the same NUMMI concepts to revitalize their companies and reinvent themselves.

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Lubricant application nozzle

10 FAQs about preparing, applying, reclaiming lubricants

June 17, 2008

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Answers to frequently asked questions regarding lubricant preparation, lubricant application, and lubricant reclamation.

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Active leveling control interface

Applying parallelism technology in hydraulic presses

June 17, 2008

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Active leveling control (ALC) counteracts the negative effects of off-center loading; significant breakthrough shock common with high-strength steels (HSS); and reverse shock loading associated with nitrogen springs in dies.

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Torsion spring component

Silicon Valley stamper sizes up, down electronics

June 17, 2008

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California electronics stamper Scandic Springs Inc. faces challenges of stamping ever-shrinking electronics components as well as stamping larger parts, such as enclosures.

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Die part hard marks

Reading progressive die strip — Part II

June 2, 2008

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Looking at the results of a process—in this case, the strip produced in the die—certainly can lead to good data indicating the root cause of a problem. Distorted, elongated pilot holes, mismatched cuts are common defects. Distorted pilot holes can be the result of a poor carrier design. An improperly set up feed release can cause misfeeds, pilot hole elongation, and bent, broken, or galled pilots, as well as poor part location and gauging.

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Die part hard marks image

Reading progressive die strips — Part II

June 1, 2008

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Looking at the results of a process—in this case, the strip produced in the die—certainly can lead to good data indicating the root cause of a problem. This Part II of a two-part series discusses hard marks, poor die design, and coil-related problems.

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