STAMPING Journal®

September/October 2002

STAMPING Journal® is the only industrial publication dedicated solely to serving the needs of the metal stamping market. In 1987 the American Metal Stamping Association broadened its horizons and renamed itself and its publication, known then as Metal Stamping. Print subscriptions are free to qualified stamping professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the September/October 2002 issue available online:

One step forming simulation

Taking advantage of simulation technology

October 24, 2002

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One of the most valuable high-tech tools introduced in the last decade has been finite element analysis (FEA) simulation software that stamping tool makers can use to test forming conditions and design dies in the virtual world. This reduces tooling and product design time and saves costs of prototyping and experimentation to find the right design. Training the tool designer or process engineer how to use simulation software can provide a quick ROI and improve the bottom line.

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Airless sprayed part figure 1

Tooling: Lube it or lose it

September 26, 2002

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Most metal forming operations use lubricants to protect the tooling and part from excessive wear caused by scuffing, scratching, scoring, welding, and galling. Four lubricant families are commonly used in pressworking, and thousands of formulations are available within each chemical family. The physical characteristics of the lubricant and metal forming operation involved determine the application method to be used.

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What to look for in end-of-arm tooling

February 28, 2002

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Many factors affect the real cost of clamps used in end-of-arm tooling. Their original price is important, but other factors have a major effect on production. Four of the most important are delivery, flexibility, durability, and useful life.

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Pairing a servo feed with a pull-through straightener

December 13, 2001

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This article explores the possibility that servo feeds can be used with pull-through straighteners as opposed to a conventional feed line that uses a powered straightener. Using the servo-PTS (pull-through straightener) can save money on equipment and material. The only limitation may be marking the material so noncosmetic applications are recommended.

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Designing presses and dies with FEA

November 29, 2001

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To develop or find a new tool and perhaps a new press to make a part, managers need information about the tonnage requirement, which mean they will need to know more about how the part will form and the loads it will impart into the press and tooling also. Linear or nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) can find the information so managers can make an informed decision. With FEA, a fabricator uses a computer-aided design system to develop a model of the part, and then the computer divides the part into many small parts. The FEA software then applies standard stress analysis equations to each side of every part.

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Gettin' down with downtime

November 29, 2001

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Reducing the time it takes to change dies it important to all stampers, especially for custom stampers that run small-quantity jobs. This article summarizes the ways in which automation has helped in this process and then covers two die change methods that are used in a quick change system: the standardized clamping system and the V-notch, or key, system.

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