The Tube & Pipe Journal®

June 2008

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


More Info Subscribe Free

Selected articles from the June 2008 issue available online:

One pipe or two?

June 17, 2008

By:

The energy sector is hot right now, and so is pipe production. Finding the optimum material for making pipe for this industry is tricky. Low-alloy carbon steels tend to be strong, but lack corrosion resistance. Stainless steels resist corrosion but lack strength. Cladding low-alloy carbon steel with a thin layer of a corrosion-resistant alloy is a suitable process, one that AWS Schaefer has devised for manufacturing such pipes.

Continue Reading

Chrome Moly Welding

The lowdown on low-alloy filler metals

June 17, 2008

By: ,

When welding a chromium-molybdenum alloy, selecting the optimal filler wire is critical to the long-term durability of the weld. Fortunately, matching the filler metal to the alloy is no more difficult than it is for matching a filler metal to any other family of alloys. Understanding the chemical and mechanical properties of the materials can go a long way in making strong, corrosion- and creep-resistant welds.

Continue Reading

Stopwatch image

No time to waste

June 17, 2008

By:

For the past decade or so, the headline stories have painted a grim picture for the world's economies. The Asian financial crisis (1997) was followed by a free-fall in stock prices (2000) and a recession that stalled many of the world's leading and emerging economies (2001), leaving many to wonder...

Continue Reading

Tube bending figure 1

Top 10 misconceptions about automation

June 15, 2008

By:

Fabricators frequently react to the idea of automation with powerful objections, many of which are based on information that is obsolete, incomplete, or simply incorrect. The reality is that automated systems can increase quality, profitability, and production rates; reduce costs and setup times; improve safety; simplify machine operation; and provide manufacturing flexibility.

Continue Reading