The Tube & Pipe Journal®

September 2007

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the September 2007 issue available online:

FEA

Achieving aluminum's mass at steel's cost

September 11, 2007

By: ,

Tube traditionally is produced with a constant wall thickness, leaving design engineers stuck with designing tubular parts and unable to optimize them. A tube with variable wall thickness changes all that. This technology allows design engineers to specify the wall thickness in various areas of a tubular component—increasing the wall thickness in bend regions to prevent splitting and decreasing wall thickness elsewhere to reduce part weight.

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Copper tube mill

Reducing conversion cost in a copper tube mill

September 11, 2007

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Sorting through the myriad quality programs and manufacturing trends—total quality management, Six Sigma, lean manufacturing—can be a daunting challenge. Knowing which strategies to use and how to use them can deliver big results in a copper tube production facility.

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Welder image

Giving the nod

September 11, 2007

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Autodarkening helmets do more than just protect welders from infrared and ultraviolet light the second the arc is struck. By allowing users to keep the helmet down over the face, the helmets help to prevent unnecessary neck strain, which can lead to long-term repetitive stress injury.

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Automatic lubrication application

Better lubricant control leads to better mandrel bends

September 11, 2007

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In an effort to reduce the need for cleaning bent tube, fabricator R & B Wagner analyzed its operations and decided to change from manual lubricant application to an automated system. The result was that its lubricant consumption dropped 70 percent. So little lubricant was left on the bent parts that the company eliminated the cleaning step.

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airplane image

A high-flying metal fabricator

September 11, 2007

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From its beginning in 1986 as a machine shop, Custom Tube Products has changed to a fabrication shop. Along the way it has adapted to the skilled worker shortage, mainly by trading in its manual processes for automation.

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