The Tube & Pipe Journal®

April/May 2006

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the April/May 2006 issue available online:

Flushing out four-letter words: rust, dirt, and wear - TheFabricator

Flushing out four-letter words: rust, dirt, and wear (Part I)

October 10, 2006

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Rust, wear, and dirt cost tube fabricators and producers millions of dollars annually, and they can be the bane of tube processes. Analyzing the criteria for selecting the lubricant, cleaner, and rust preventative can help provide maximum protection.

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The regrind process for tube mill tooling

June 13, 2006

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Although most tube and pipe producers don't get too involved in the regrind process, it is crucial—reconditioning roll tooling can extend its useful life by 15 or 20 times. The regrind process reduces the producer's overall out-of-pocket tooling expenses, while helping to ensure the tooling continues to produce a consistent-quality product at the required speeds. A better understanding of the process, especially familiarity with the types of flaws that reconditioning can and cannot resolve, can go a long way toward a better working relationship between a tube and pipe producer and its regrind contractor.

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When a good tube bends bad - Part II

April 11, 2006

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Editor's note: This is the second part of a two-part article that examines tube bending defects, possible causes, and suggested remedies. Part I discusses surface defects; Part II covers other defects, such as wall thinning, ovality, buckling, and fractures. When the stress on the...

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The regrind process for tube mill tooling - Part I

April 11, 2006

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Although most tube and pipe producers don't get too involved in the regrind process, it is crucial—reconditioning roll tooling can extend its useful life by 15 or 20 times. The regrind process reduces the producer's overall out-of-pocket tooling expenses, while helping to ensure the tooling continues to produce a consistent-quality product at the required speeds. A better understanding of the process, especially familiarity with the types of flaws that reconditioning can and cannot resolve, can go a long way toward a better working relationship between a tube and pipe producer and its regrind contractor.

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Intelligent Robotic Welding

April 11, 2006

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Planning a productive intelligent robotic welding workcell requires many phases. These include preplanning with a computer simulation, getting the virtual results to translate into real-world operation, using multiple robots within the workcell for material handling as well as welding, and utilizing vision systems to help compensate for part variations.

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Eliminating problems that cause flaws

April 11, 2006

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Problematic material? Yes, bad coil is out there. It could be mislabeled; the yield strength could vary from one part of the coil to another; it might have damaged edges; and so on. In the second part of this two-part series, columnist Bud Graham discusses steel coil, how its characteristics can vary, and how these variations can result in substandard tube.

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What do you monitor to ensure quality?

April 11, 2006

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Most manufacturers measure or test parts to verify that the parts meet quality standards. This conventional approach is time-consuming because testing adds steps and time to the production process. Furthermore, it is only as good as the sample size. A different approach to quality is to use a strain monitor to measure strain on the machine's frame. Comparing the strain with a reference (measured when the machine was known to be producing good parts) is a way to monitor the production process, and it doesn't require extra time or steps.

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