TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal®

March 2003

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the March 2003 issue available online:

Simulating a robotic workcell

March 8, 2005

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Not so long ago, setting up a robotic work cell was a trial-and-error affair. However, advances in simulation technology allow manufacturers to visualize a robotic work cell and sort out any problems before setting up the cell. Simulating the work cell's function helps to ensure the cell will yield the desired results and helps prevent costly mistakes and re-engineering.

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Boatmaker finds new saw for trailer production

April 24, 2003

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At its factory in Vonore, Tenn., MasterCraft builds boats and trailers in adjacent bays. It offers the option of a trailer with every ski boat it sells.

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The anatomy of a monster truck

April 24, 2003

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It drives right over nearly every obstacle in its path and splits nearly every eardrum in its vicinity. It's supercharged, oversized, and extraordinary. It stands more than 10 feet tall, develops more than 1,500 horsepower, and can leap over a 727 jet airliner in a single bound.

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Coating fabricating tooling

April 24, 2003

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Tube fabricators all over the country are starting to see some major benefits from new coating technology. Many coatings-both those that are time-proven and new ones just hitting the market-can provide many benefits for many tube fabrication processes, including extended tooling life, better finished parts, and less stress on machinery.

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Solving the mysteries of the fin pass—Part 1

April 10, 2003

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The fin pass was not the first time your father gave you five bucks for your allowance. The fin passes are those forming passes that immediately follow the breakdown or initial forming stages on a tube mill. Their role is paramount in the successful final presentation of the formed tubular section to the welding process.

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Making the connection

April 10, 2003

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Hundreds of types of machined end connectors are used to transmit fluid in fabricated tube and hose assemblies. In recent years manufacturers and end users of these connectors have been developing new methods and processes that eliminate machined connectors and the associated joining operation. Eliminating connectors and joining operations can help save both money and time.

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Fill 'er Up

March 27, 2003

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Hydroforming is gaining ground in the manufacture of many automotive components,such as pillars, frame rails, and engine cradles. Automakers are finding hydroforming advantageous for forming many smaller parts also. The process is useful for manufacturing an automobile fuel filler tube, which is the expanded portion of a fuel filler assembly where a fuel nozzle is inserted.

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Specifying the sulfur content of 316L stainless steel for orbital welding

March 27, 2003

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The widespread use of autogenous (fusion) orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in the high-purity semiconductor and biopharmaceutical industries, combined with modern steel refining technology, has made it both desirable and practical to supply type 316L stainless steel with a restricted range of elemental sulfur.

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The basics of roll form tooling design

March 27, 2003

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You can successfully roll-form a profile more than one way. In fact, many roll form designers take different approaches to design and development. Also, because the roll forming process has a seeming limitless capacity to produce complex profiles with just as many variables, many roll form designs are one-of-a-kind; therefore, theory can go only so far.

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