The Tube & Pipe Journal®

October/November 2002

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the October/November 2002 issue available online:

Comparing materials for high-temperature steam piping

January 16, 2003

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Of all the materials used for high-temperature steam piping, X20 (12 percent chromium, 1 percent molybdenum, 1/4 percent vanadium) and P91 (9 percent chromium, 1 percent molybdenum, 1/4 percent vanadium) stand out because of their very high creep rupture properties, even at elevated temperatures.

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Assessing developments in orbital welding—Part 2

December 12, 2002

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Orbital welding's advantages in productivity, quality, consistency, tracability, and skill level required are the driving factors behind its growth. Advances such as oxygen analyzers that prevent the weld cycle from starting until oxygen is properly purged, combined with its ability to generate a written report of each weld, form the basis for orbital welding's improved quality and tracability.

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Merging research with manufacturing

November 7, 2002

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To thrive in competitive markets, manufacturers must innovate. Innovation often relies on research. However, most manufacturing firms lack the financial and human resources necessary to conduct research that leads to innovation.

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Lubes and the new materials: It's a different game

November 7, 2002

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Changes taking place in tube and pipe producing and fabricating may require you to review your lubrication strategies. One of these changes is the increased use of aluminum, aluminized steel, and stainless steel tubing.

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Tube cutting laser

Focusing on tube cutting lasers

November 7, 2002

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State-of-the-art laser technology for cutting metal tubes includes capabilities for cutoff, beveling, and cutting an infinite variety of shapes such as holes, slots, and notches. In this article, manufacturers of laser cutting equipment discuss the state of advancements such as automated loading and unloading of parts; simplified programming; automatedinspection of finished parts; and lights-out operation.

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