The Tube & Pipe Journal®

March 2004

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


More Info Subscribe Free

Selected articles from the March 2004 issue available online:

Troubleshooting OCTG threading: Part I

August 5, 2009

By:

High production threading of tube and pipe for use by the petroleum industry is accomplished using either mechanically actuated or digitally controlled, carbide tooled machines. The most effective way to deal with residual stress is to full body anneal each tube prior to machining; however, this may not be economically possible. One alternative is to limit the amount of energy that the tube is subjected to during machining. An examination of the cutting tools that are used to produce threaded product will reveal how the shape of the insert may affect the deformation of the tube.

Continue Reading

Part feature developments in hydroforming products

March 25, 2004

By:

Tube hydroforming technology continues to develop in ways that improve part utility, economy, or process robustness. Auto parts that have recently been produced by hydroforming include roof rails, radiator enclosures, a front-end structural module, and roof rails.

Continue Reading

Developments in hydroforming

March 25, 2004

By:

Commentary from the people interviewed at the International Conference on Hydroforming (Oct. 2003) indicate that trends include an increasing interest in forming aluminum and other lightweight materials; more use of tailored tubes; and that sheet hydroforming is expected to grow faster than tube hydroforming.

Continue Reading

Low-tech system mechanizes pipe welding: Backing device allows GMAW on open root

March 11, 2004

By:

Welding technology has changed dramatically over the last few decades. Although skilled welders always will be needed in manufacturing, mechanical welding devices can provide improvements over manual welding in terms of repeatability and throughput.

Continue Reading