The Tube & Pipe Journal®

September 2002

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the September 2002 issue available online:

Material property variations in tubes used for hydroforming

October 10, 2002

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As tubular hydroforming becomes a competitive process for the mass production of automotive parts, a tube's material properties must be consistent. To predict variations in material properties, many tube producers use the uniaxial tensile test. Because the specimens for the tensile test are collected before a tube is bent and welded, they are not always accurate. To predict variations in tube property accurately, it should be tested under a biaxial state of stress.

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Analyzing tubes, lubes, dies, and friction

October 10, 2002

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Comparing and correlating two tests, a common bench test (twist compression) and a straight-tube corner-fill test, simulate hydroforming to find the coefficient of friction.

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Enclosed-arc weld heads

Assessing developments in orbital welding—Part 1

September 12, 2002

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The GTAW Process Editor's Note: This article is the first part of a two-part series about developments in orbital welding. Part I discusses power supplies, weld heads, and electrodes. Part II, which will appear in the October/November issue, will focus on hardware and accessories that improve...

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Designing a hydroforming press for research, production

September 12, 2002

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A new type of hydroforming press was recently developed for sheet applications. The new press incorporates data acquisition and control features for research purposes. Current press frame designs for tube and sheet forming are uneconomic for large forces. This press achieves a clamping force of 100 mN, which is absorbed by a single cast frame with a circumferential pretensioning system.

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Lubricant comparison chart

Forming exhaust components with an alternative lubricant

September 12, 2002

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Switching from an oil-based lubricant to a water-based gel lubricant helped an exhaust-system components manufacturer, Zeuna Starker, reduce costs and cycle time. After studying several types of lubricants, the company chose a water-based gel that was less prone to spilling onto the floor and did not produce smoke during the welding process. The company reaped benefits in decreased housekeeping and disposal costs, and found that it did not need to wash the lubricant residue from semifinished parts before welding.

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