The Tube & Pipe Journal®

January/February 2012

TPJ - The Tube & Pipe Journal® became the first magazine dedicated to serving the metal tube and pipe industry in 1990. Today, it remains the only North American publication devoted to this industry and it has become the most trusted source of information for tube and pipe professionals. Subscriptions are free to qualified tube and pipe professionals in North America.


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Selected articles from the January/February 2012 issue available online:

What's driving these industries? - TheFabricator.com

What's driving the tube/pipe industry?

February 1, 2012

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Interviews with several TUBE expo exhibitors reveal that two booming industries throughout the world are energy extraction and automobile production. Although some industries are expected to lag in 2012, notably the U.S. housing construction sector, on balance the year is expected to be stable for the tube and pipe production and fabrication industries.

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Evaluating drawing lubricants - TheFabricator.com

Evaluating drawing lubricants

February 1, 2012

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Chlorinated lubricants, which have been phased out in Canada and Europe, are still used in many metal-forming applications in the U.S. This class of lubricants is under scrutiny in the U.S., so it makes sense to test alternative lubricants now. Evaluating a lubricant for drawing tube requires much more than simply measuring the draw load during a pull. A comprehensive test evaluates ease of cleaning and finished tube quality also.

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Fabrication automation - TheFabricator.com

Fabrication automation

January 10, 2012

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Need help dealing with the skilled worker shortage? Eric Lundin, editor of TPJ-The Tube & Pipe Journal, interviewed several automated equipment manufacturers for their perspectives on automation for tube and pipe fabrication.

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Introducing Solid-State Technology - TheFabricator.com

Introducing solid-state laser technology

January 9, 2012

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Although the solid-state laser is considered new in metal cutting processes, the first laser demonstration in a laboratory in 1960 was a solid-state laser. CO2 lasers turned out to be more practical for cutting metals, but solid-state lasers are making headway. Understanding laser equipment and the physics involved in generating a laser beam helps to explain the capability differences between CO2 and solid-state lasers.

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