Selected articles from the May 2003 issue available online:

Art From the Forge

May 29, 2003

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Those of you who are busy fulfilling commissions for gates, fences, staircases, and the myriad items that keep food on the table might want to look at artwork created by people whose backgrounds are based in the arts. Metalworkers often are so tuned to traditional designs that they are unaware of a swelling modern movement that could generate new ideas, new visions, and new clients.

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Robots and dials and knobs—oh my!

May 29, 2003

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In the late 1950s, the U.S. Navy wanted to find a way to join heavy aluminum structural sections used to fabricate motor torpedo boat hulls.

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Sick at Work?

May 15, 2003

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All employees have days at work when they don't feel well. Usually these days are intermittent and can be attributed to a cold or other illness or job-related stress.

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SMAW Basics—How much do you know?

May 15, 2003

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Editor's Note: This article covers basic SMAW questions and answers. Preceding the SMAW section is the author's opinion about the importance of retaining federal funding for vocational programs. If you would like to express an opinion about this topic, please feel free to do so. What...

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Overcoming organizational paralysis

May 15, 2003

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Paralysis – what a horrible thought. What if you found yourself in a situation in which you had partial or complete loss of motion and sensation in your body?

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Mediating commercial conflict

May 15, 2003

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This article explores some of the aspects of a commercial mediation I performed some years ago. The identities of the participants and the facts of the case have been changed to preserve the participants' privacy and the confidentiality inherent in mediation cases. This case was selected because of the intense emotional feelings that surrounded what should have been a straightforward and rather simple business arrangement. So often it seems that the feelings, emotions, and egos of the participants in a conflict can mean more than the dollars or tangible value involved.

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