Selected articles from the October 2006 issue available online:

Die Basics 101: Part X

October 10, 2006

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Cutting is the most severe metalworking process that takes place in a die and shouldn't be taken lightly. Cutting Basics Cutting metal requires great force. For example, it takes approximately 78,000 lbs. of pressure to cut a 10-in.-diameter blank from 0.100-in.-thick mild steel. Consequently,...

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Machine components you can fabricate with an abrasive jet

October 10, 2006

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Many machine components formerly made with conventional machining techniques now can be made easily and cost-effectively with abrasive waterjet cutting. This article discusses some of these components. It also gives examples of abrasive waterjet-produced signs and labels that can be used to enhance your products.

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The evolution of tube hydroforming

October 10, 2006

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The growth in hydroforming use has slowed as tube hydroformers, particularly in the automotive industry, are taking a step back to examine process options in an effort to determine the most efficient, cost-effective process. Some even have reverted to stamping and welding formerly hydroformed parts. This article explains how the industry got to this point and where it's headed.

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Welder health and safety — Who's responsible?

October 10, 2006

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The "Welding Wire" e-newsletter asked subscribers their opinions about who is responsible for ensuring welder health and safety. This article describes the hazards inherent in welding and contains insight from a welding instructor, a business owner, and individuals with personal knowledge of unsafe operations.

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Fabricators in search of skilled workers

September 12, 2006

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A recent survey of metal fabricators shows that the vast majority of fabricating companies desperately need skilled labor. These companies are employing various methods to find qualified workers and to compensate for the shortage. Despite the difficulty finding skilled labor, some fabricators would not encourage young people to pursue careers in manufacturing.

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