Tube and Pipe Fabrication

The tube and pipe fabrication technology area covers sawing (band, circular, and friction) and other cutting processes, such as abrasive, flame, laser, oxyfuel, plasma, and waterjet. It also discusses forming processes, including bending and end forming. Finally, it includes a handful of miscellaneous processes, such as trimming, beveling, finning, grooving, threading, and spinning.

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The little-known life of the scarfing tool

June 26, 2003

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Who cares about scarfing tools? There are more important things in life. When the beauty pageant contestant is asked what problem she would like to solve, she's more likely to answer "I'd like to establish world peace" than "I wish I could find ways to help scarfing tools last longer."

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Waste not, want not

June 12, 2003

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Any manufacturing process that goes awry can result in waste in many forms, both obvious and hidden. A simple project in which tube is cut, bent, formed, and welded can result in large amounts of wasted money and time if one of the processes goes wrong.

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Batter up! Turning an aluminum tube into a baseball bat

May 29, 2003

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The roar of the crowd, the shouts of the umpire, the crack of the bat hitting the ball—these are the unmistakable sounds of a baseball game. Over the last few decades, however, one of those sounds has changed; now the bat tends to make a distinctive, resonating ping. It's the sound of aluminum rather than wood making contact with the ball.

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Automotive motives - Tips for cutting per-piece prices for automotive customers

May 29, 2003

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Today's automotive industry is more competitive than ever. To compete with the European, Mexican, and Asian markets, the U.S. market must become more aggressive in finding ways to cut costs.

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Inspecting welds on complex tube forms

May 15, 2003

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Eddy current has long been used for inspecting straight seamless or welded tubing. New developments allow the use of this technology to inspect complex tube forms as well.

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Producing holes in tubing

May 15, 2003

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Need to put a hole in a tube? This article provides an overview of tube punching and tube piercing, exploring the different variations of each method and comparing the two methods on cost, safety, and flexibility.

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Brazing copper tubing

May 15, 2003

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Torch brazing copper tubing is one of the most common–but widely misunderstood–joining processes. It's possible to make sound joints that are just as strong as the copper tube, easier to braze, and less expensive to produce. But first you have to know basic brazing concepts, including joint design, filler metal behavior, and metallurgy.

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The anatomy of a monster truck

April 24, 2003

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It drives right over nearly every obstacle in its path and splits nearly every eardrum in its vicinity. It's supercharged, oversized, and extraordinary. It stands more than 10 feet tall, develops more than 1,500 horsepower, and can leap over a 727 jet airliner in a single bound.

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Coating fabricating tooling

April 24, 2003

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Tube fabricators all over the country are starting to see some major benefits from new coating technology. Many coatings-both those that are time-proven and new ones just hitting the market-can provide many benefits for many tube fabrication processes, including extended tooling life, better finished parts, and less stress on machinery.

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Making the connection

April 10, 2003

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Hundreds of types of machined end connectors are used to transmit fluid in fabricated tube and hose assemblies. In recent years manufacturers and end users of these connectors have been developing new methods and processes that eliminate machined connectors and the associated joining operation. Eliminating connectors and joining operations can help save both money and time.

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Making the cut

April 10, 2003

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Band sawing is the starting point for many tube and pipe fabricating operations, and it can help determine the throughput and profitability of your whole shop. Maximizing the productivity of tube or pipe cutoff requires a coordinated approach to saw blades, sawing machines, and your cutoff process.

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Specifying the sulfur content of 316L stainless steel for orbital welding

March 27, 2003

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The widespread use of autogenous (fusion) orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in the high-purity semiconductor and biopharmaceutical industries, combined with modern steel refining technology, has made it both desirable and practical to supply type 316L stainless steel with a restricted range of elemental sulfur.

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The basics of roll form tooling design

March 27, 2003

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You can successfully roll-form a profile more than one way. In fact, many roll form designers take different approaches to design and development. Also, because the roll forming process has a seeming limitless capacity to produce complex profiles with just as many variables, many roll form designs are one-of-a-kind; therefore, theory can go only so far.

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Heating P91 boiler pipe

March 13, 2003

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In the power piping industry, turnaround time on a boiler pipe project typically is from 20 to 36 weeks. But J.F. Ahern Co. (JFA), Fond du Lac, Wis., a company ranked as one of the Midwest's top 10 mechanical contractors according to the May 2002 Contractor magazine, isn't typical. Neither were the results JFA achieved when it switched to induction technology for pipe preheating.

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Using precision abrasive wheel technology

March 13, 2003

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Precision abrasive wheel cutting is a small but important niche in the abrasive cutting field. It can be used to cut many types of parts, including metal rods, tubes, extruded shapes, and even wire. It is most useful in operations characterized by small parts, hard-to-cut materials, and tight tolerances.

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