Paul Cameron


Braun Intertec
4210 Highway 14 East
Rochester, MN 55904

Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Explaining essential and nonessential variables for a WPS

November 30, 2016 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I am unclear on the American Petroleum Institute’s Standard 1104 regarding a weld procedure specification (WPS). Section 5.3.2.3 says: The ranges of specified outside diameters (ODs) and specified wall thicknesses over which the procedure is applicable shall be identified. Groupings are shown...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Understanding acceptable undercut

September 23, 2016 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I find myself rejecting a lot of welds. I don't want to fail them and find out that I misinterpreted something. When there are small amounts of undercut throughout the length of the weld, I'm still not clear on what AWS means by "... in 2 inches up to 12 inches" [AWS D1.1, Table 6.1(7)]. So I...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: All’s <i>not</i> fair in welding between U.S. and Canada

July 22, 2016 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I know what you're thinking—another early Saturday morning question.... I've been looking at the requirements for obtaining a Canadian Welding Bureau CWB) inspector certification. Am I seeing this correctly? A CWB inspector can apply for an AWS certified welding inspector (CWI) by reciprocity...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Defining a fillet weld with D1.1

May 13, 2016 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I'm auditing a fab shop and have a question regarding the AWS D1.1 code. The shop is referring to the corner joints in the plates encompassing the columns as fillet welds, yet there is no faying surface. D1.1 says a fillet can have up to 3/16-in. misalignment (with certain stipulations), which...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: What does a “repair WPS” mean?

March 28, 2016 | By Paul Cameron

When a code requires a repair weld procedure specification (WPS), what exactly does that mean? PWC explains.

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Writing a WPS for an unlisted material

January 29, 2016 | By Paul Cameron

Q: Can you point me in the right direction for procedure qualification record (PQR)/welding procedure specification (WPS) testing of pipe/tube to plate for fillets and partial-joint-penetration (PJP) grooves? The joint is a bevel groove covered by a fillet. The pipe/tube is unlisted AWS D1.1...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: For the record: Grounding, work leads are <i>not</i> the same

November 16, 2015 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I am writing this in regards to an article you wrote last year about grounding and grounds (“Achieving a good work lead connection,” Practical Welding Today, July/August 2014, p. 58). You mentioned that grounding to a structure should not be used if at all possible. My question is this: If...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Qualified versus certified—What’s the difference?

September 28, 2015 | By Paul Cameron

Q: While browsing the AWS website I found listings for accredited test facilities. After a little more digging, I found AWS QC4-89, the standard for accreditation of test facilities. I was of the understanding that my endorsement as a certified welding inspector (CWI) permitted me to certify...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Cleaning material with brake cleaner before welding

July 24, 2015 | By Paul Cameron

Combining welding and brake cleaners can lead to serious illness, permanent damage to your internal organs, or even death.

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Plugging holes and pinholes

May 12, 2015 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I am machining a bearing housing made out of 1045 and I have to plug and weld some cross holes. I am also using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to eliminate a weld that is too large. My problem is that I am getting pinholes in my weld. Is it because I am welding 1018 to 1045? We didn’t machine...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: How to inspect a coated weldment

March 16, 2015 | By Paul Cameron

Q: How can I inspect/verify welds on painted product without being destructive? Eric D. A: Coatings come in many varieties on fabricated products. Galvanizing, painting, and even oxidizing a weathering steel will have a negative impact on the weld inspection process. For visual inspection, which...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Put your finger on it

January 20, 2015 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I'm a welding instructor at a steel mill in northwest Indiana. We attended the “Train the Trainer” class at the Hobart Institute of Welding Technology 12 years ago to certify in all positions, limited and unlimited thickness plates with backing, using all shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Those dang CVN requirements

November 21, 2014 | By Paul Cameron

Q: Table 4.6 of AWS D1.1: 2010 is a list of supplementary essential variable changes that would require weld procedure specification (WPS) requalification due to Charpy V-notch (CVN) testing requirements. Under base metal (item 2) it indicates: Minimum thickness qualified is T or 5/8 inch...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Hands-off MIG education

October 30, 2014 | By Paul Cameron

Q: I recently bought a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) machine, and I’ve also just completed a beginner’s welding course at the local college. Unfortunately, the basics don’t explain enough about the controls, such as voltage, wire speed, and stickout, and how they affect the weld penetration,...

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Arc Welding | Articles

Arc Welding 101: Determining correct gas ratios

October 29, 2014 | By Paul Cameron

Q: For years we have used 75/25 argon/carbon dioxide during gas metal arc welding (GMAW). I was told by my supplier that I needed to change to 90/10. Will one gas mixture provide better welding penetration than the other? Most of our work is mild steel (A-36), 0.1875 to 0.25 in. thick, although we...

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